Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
     
in.
mm.
in.
mm.
in.
mm.
 
M1854
Socket bayonet originally for use on the Dornbuchse M/1849 rifles employed by Prussian-supplied forces rebelling against the Danish Govt. in 1849–1851.  The rifles and bayonets were taken into Danish service and reissued as the Suhler Tapriffel Model 1854.

Unique locking spring designed by Johan Christian Wilken Kyhl (pronounced, 'cool') and first introduced in 1794.  The Kyhl spring catch was used on Danish bayonets from 1794–1860 and also on bayonets made by Norwegian and Prussian makers.

According to Per Holmback, noted authority on Scandinavian bayonets, approximately 12,000 of these weapons were taken over by the Danish Army after 1851 (from the Schleswig-Holstein rebels) and converted in 1854. The marking "SH XV B 186" stands for Schleswig Holstein 15th Battalion, Weapon 186.

19.25
489
22.375
568
.855
21.7
Ricasso: Proofmark

Shank: German proofmarks

Socket:  "1855_4397" and "SH XV B 186"

M1 Knife bayonet for use on the caliber .30–06 M1 Garand rifle, designated Gevær m/50).

The USA provided 69,808 M1 rifles to Denmark prior to 1963 under the Military Assistance Program. Denmark subsequently purchased an additional 20,000 M1 rifles produced in Italy.

This example is a Second World War U.S.  M1 bayonet,  manufactured by the Union Fork and Hoe Co., Columbus, Ohio. 

The Danish-made scabbard copies the U.S. M7 scabbard, with the composition lower portion having a wood grain pattern instead of the U.S. M7's olive green.

HMAK is an abbreviation of Hærens Materiel Kommando (Army Materiel Command). The HMAK marking was used beginning in 1969.

9.75 248 14.375 365 .640 16.3 Ricasso: "U.F.H." over "U. ordinance bomb S."

Scabbard:  "HMAK"

m/50 This example is a Danish copy of the U.S. M1 bayonet, made in 1955. Where these bayonet were produced has not been established. The likelihood is that they were made in Germany (perhaps by E & F Hörster).

FKF is an abbreviation of Førsvarets Krigsmateriel Førvaltning (Defense War Materiel Administration). This marking was used prior to 1960.

HTK is an abbreviation of Hærens Tekniske Korps (Army Technical Corps). This marking was used 1960–69.

9.75 251 14.625 371 .620 15.7 Ricasso: Crown over "FKF" over "1955"

Scabbard:  Crown over "HTK"

Web Strap Belt Frog Strap-type belt frog for securing the U.S. M7 scabbard (and it's Danish clone) to the Danish Army's British Pattern 1937 style web equipment belt.

The frog measures 8.00 in.(210 mm.) long by 1.625 in. (42 mm.) wide.

This example is made of khaki green webbing and dates from the 1960s.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a Reverse" crown over "HTK"
Web Strap Belt Frog An earlier, 1950s example, made of tan webbing. It measures 8 in.(210 mm.) long by 1.625 in. (42 mm.) wide.

FKF is the abbreviation for the Forsvarets Krigsmaterial Forvalning (Defense War Material Administration). This marking was used prior to 1960.

The images at left show the frog in use.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a Reverse" crown over "FKF"
Rectangular Belt Frog Rectangular adaptor for securing the U.S. M7 scabbard (and it's Danish clone) to the Danish Army's British Pattern 1937 style web equipment belt.

This example is made of tan webbing. It measures 4.00 in.(102 mm.) wide by 2.25 in. (57 mm.) high.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a Reverse" crown over "FKF" over "1957"
Rectangular Belt Frog This example is from the 1960s and is made of two different shades of tan webbing.

It measures 3.875 in.(98 mm.) wide by 2.125 in. (54 mm.) high.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a Reverse" crown over "HTK"
Rectangular Belt Frog This example is from the 1960s and is made of olive green webbing.

It measures 4.00 in.(102 mm.) wide by 2.25 in. (57 mm.) high.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a Reverse" crown over "HTK"
m/62 Bayonet-knife used as a field knife by Denmark. Although it would mount to the M1 Garand rifle, it was typically issued as a field knife, without regard to whether the soldier was armed with the M1 rifle.

The m/62 is a copy of the U.S. M5A1 bayonet, adopted by Denmark in 1962. Two production variants exist. both made in Germany. Early production is believed to have been produced by E & F Hörster. These had a peened pommel, as shown in the image at left. Later production had a smooth pommel and were marked "HMAK." These are believed to have been produced by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik. It is believed that approximately 33,000 m/62 bayonets were procured by Denmark.

The scabbard is a copy of the US M8A1, except for the woodgrain colored plastic and British-style belt fastener.

HTK is an abbreviation of Hærens Tekniske Korps (Army Technical Corps). This marking was used 1960–69.

6.625 168 11.25 286 n/a Pommel: Crown over "HTK" over "M/62"

Scabbard:  Crown over "HTK"

m/75 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber AG3 (Automatgevær 3) assault rifle. The AG3 is a variant of the German G3.

The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet-knife. This example has the 10:30 press catch, however, examples may also be found with the 9 O'clock press catch. Three m/75 variations exist:

— The earliest examples had a black 6–groove grip; broad notched crosspiece; and steel pommel.

—A second variant had a 7–groove grip, half-notched crosspiece; and plastic pommel.

— This example is of the third variant, which is identical to the second, except for the narrow plain crosspiece.

Earlier scabbards had the British-style belt fastener, like the m/62 bayonet scabbard above. Later scabbards, like this example, had the U.S. M1910-style wire belt hanger.

All Danish m/75 bayonets were made in Germany. This example was made by AES. However, early examples may have been produced by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik, E & F Hörster, or another contractor. The flashguard marking, HMAK, is an abbreviation of Hærens Materiel Kommando (Army Materiel Command). The HMAK marking was used beginning in 1969.

In 2009, British bayonet historian R.D.C. Evans published an excellent and comprehensive article on G3 bayonets that is available for download at no cost.

Denmark purchased G3 rifles from Rheinmettal AG in Germany in the mid-1960s, designating them the Gevær m/66. The m/66 had a selector lock that required insertion of a special key to enable full automatic fire. In the mid-1970s, the Danes leased additional G3 rifles from Germany, designating them the Gevær m/75. The m/75 rifles were true selective-fire weapons. These were issued to the regular army and the m/66 rifles relegated to the home guard. The G3 was replaced in regular army service by the Diemaco C7 (M16) in the mid-1990s.

G3 and CETME Bayonets Page

6.75 171 12.25 311 .875 22.2 Flashguard: crown over "HMAK"
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Bayonets of Denmark

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