Country Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Description Length Width Markings
   
in. mm. in. mm.
Argentina Leather belt frog used with the M1891 and M1909 rifle bayonets; and with the M1891 Engineer's Carbine bayonet. Also used with the M1909 artillery short sword.

Made of thick, stiff green leather with a hilt strap.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

9.375 240 2.75 70 None.
Nylon belt frog used by the Argentine Marines with the FAL Type A bayonet.

The body is made of material very similar to that used in automotive seat belts.

The unusual brass grommet design secures the scabbard with the frog stud facing inwards.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

8.75 222 1.875 48 None.
Austria Tooled brown leather belt frog for carrying the M1895 bayonet.

This frog is classified as #29 by Carter.

According to Carter, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary all used the #29 frog. The vast majority are unmarked. These frogs are generally presumed Austrian, absent evidence that they are not.

8.50 216 2.50 64 None.
Belgium Dark brown leather belt frog for carrying the M1916 bayonet.

Constructed with four copper rivets, with large washers. Incorporates a securing strap with a plated steel buckle. The frog originally had a hilt strap, inside the belt loop. This example is missing the hilt strap.

Carter classified this frog as #43, indicating that this frog was issued with the M1916 bayonet.

8.00 203 2.375 60 None.
Post-war belt frog for use with the SAFN 1949 and FAL bayonets.

Based on the British Pattern 1937 design, this example is made of olive green cotton webbing. It has a unique reinforcement providing a double thickness of webbing on the reverse where the frog would contact the equipment belt. The wide hilt strap floating loose inside the belt loop is characteristic of Belgian frogs.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

6.75 171 1.125 29 None.
This frog is nearly identical to the frog above, except it is made of synthetic webbing. The synthetic thread sparkles in bright light.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

7.00 178 1.25 32 None.
Britain Pattern 1937 web belt frog made for carrying the No. 4 socket bayonet.  This is representative of the typical Second World War web frog used by the British Army.

This is the second of the two P1937 subtypes that Carter classified as #154, with 1.25 in. (32 mm.) upper and lower loops.

This example was made by the Blackman Leather Goods Co. Ltd. It was made with a finished slit in the upper loop for use with the No. 4 spike bayonet.

7.25 184 1.25 32 Reverse: "B. L. G. Ltd" and date (illegible)
Pattern 1937 olive green web belt frog made for the post-war No. 5 scabbards. This example came on a FAL Type C bayonet used by the Rhodesian Army.

This frog was made in 1956 by the Mills Equipment Company. AA2016 is the stores catalogue number.  The AA prefix was always used for webbing.

Carter classified this frog as #171.

8.00 203 1.375 35 Reverse: "MECO 1956" and "P" over "N G" inside a triangle and "AA2016"
This Pattern 1937 web frog is a hybrid between the No. 5 and No. 6 Pattern 1937 belt frogs. 

It has the two 1.25 in. (32 mm.) wide scabbard loops of the No. 5, but has no eyelet or hilt strap.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

8.00 203 1.25 32 Reverse: Solid Arrow.
Thumbnail image of L3A1 (SA80) belt frogThumbnail image of L3A1 (SA80) belt frogThumbnail image of L3A1 (SA80) belt frogThumbnail image of L3A1 (SA80) belt frogThumbnail image of L3A1 (SA80) belt frog Olive green cloth-coated polyurethane over-scabbard for use with the L3A1 (SA80) socket bayonet.

This frog completely encases the scabbard and has a Fastex connector that attaches the scabbard and frog. The frog is secured to the soldier's field equipment by two straps on the reverse that incorporate steel tabs, lift-the-dot fasteners, and Velcro. The fabric has an Infra-Red Reflective coating that makes the frog less visible when viewed through night-vision technology.

This example was made in 1991 by Remploy LTD., a former sheltered-workshop for people with disabilities that, today, is a joint venture where the employees are part-owners of the company.

Early L3A1 (SA80) frogs used brass clips to secure the frog to the soldier's equipment. However, attaching or removal of the frog required dismantling of the equipment. This later example's attachment system enables easy attachment and removal.

This frog is also found in DPM (Disruptive Pattern Material) camouflage.

This frog was classified by Carter as #480

13.25 337 2.75 70 Reverse:

"Frog Bayonet IRR
Remploy Ltd.
1991
8465-99-011-2306
SL32A/5578"

 

 

Bulgaria Brown leather belt frog for use with the M1895 bayonet.

The front appears to be a replacement piece. The back shows old rivet holes, while the front is only stitched.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

7.875 200 2.50 64 Reverse: Rectangle
Canada Pattern 1915 belt frog for use with the Pattern 1907 bayonet. This frog could also be used to carry the Pattern 1903 bayonet, as well as the Pattern 1888 bayonet, upon which this frog came.

Constructed of brown leather, secured by stitching and copper rivets. Incorporates a strap and large brass roller buckle.

Carter classified this frog as #187.

6.75 171 2.375 60 Belt Loop (front): Canadian Broad Arrow acceptance mark, "6" and "22"

Belt Loop (reverse): randomly placed "6" "22" "L" "C"

Pattern 1951 olive green web belt frog for carrying the No. 4 socket bayonet.

Carter classified this frog as #190.

5.50 140 1.50 38 Illegible maker's mark and "1952"
Thumbnail image of Canadian C1 Nylon Belt FrogImage of Canadian C1 Nylon Belt Frog Green nylon web belt frog for carrying the C1 bayonet on Canadian Pattern 1982 Web Equipment.  

Although the frog’s design closely mirrored the Pattern 1964 belt frog, this nylon belt frog was used with the Pattern 1982 Web Equipment.  The NATO Stock Number is 8465-21-888-7106 and Description:  Carrier, Bayonet Scabbard—Holder, Scabbard Bayonet (C1) 82 Web

Carter classified this frog as #487.

6.50 165 2.00 51 Reverse: illegible marking
Thumbnail image of Canadian C7 nylon belt frogThumbnail image of Canadian C7 nylon belt frog Green nylon web belt frog for carrying the C7 bayonet on Canadian Pattern 1982 Web Equipment. 

The C7 bayonet introduced a lightweight plastic scabbard, which made the bayonet top-heavy when carried in the frog attached to the equipment belt.  The addition of a hilt strap stabilized the bayonet during movement.  The NATO Stock Number is 8465-21-896-8168 and Description:  Carrier, Bayonet Scabbard—Carrier, Scabbard Bayonet (C7) 82 Web.  This example was made in 2002.

Carter classified this frog as #488.

7.75 197 2.00 51 Reverse:

"Carrier, Bayonet Scabbard

8465-21-896-8168

W8486-023385/002/PB 12/02"

Thumbnail image of Canadian C7 tactical vest  belt frogThumbnail image of Canadian C7 tactical vest  belt frogThumbnail image of Canadian C7 tactical vest  belt frogThumbnail image of Canadian C7 tactical vest  belt frog Green nylon web belt frog for carrying the C7 bayonet on the Canadian Forces Tactical Vest (TV). This frog may also be used to carry the C7 bayonet on an equipment belt.

The NATO Stock Number is 8465-21-920-5771 and Description:  Carrier, Bayonet Scabbard. The Tactical Vest with which it is used was adopted ca. 2003.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

8.75 222 2.00 51 Label:

"8465-21-920-5771

Bayonet Carrier/Porte Baionnette

Date of Manufacture AT 09/06"

Denmark Strap-type belt frog for securing the U.S. M1 bayonet (and it's Danish clone, the M1950 bayonet) to the Danish Army's British Pattern 1937 style web equipment belt.

This is a 1950s example, made of tan webbing. The pictures at left show the frog in use.

FKF is the abbreviation for the Forsvarets Krigsmaterial Forvalning (Defense War Material Administration). This marking was used prior to 1960.

8.00 203 1.625 42 Reverse" crown over "FKF"
This example is made of khaki green webbing and dates from the 1960s.

HTK is the abbreviation for the Hærens Tekniske Korps (Army Technical Corps). This marking was used 1960-69.

8.00 203 1.625 42 Reverse" crown over "HTK"
Rectangular frog adaptor for securing the U.S. M7 scabbard (and it's Danish clone) to the Danish Army's British Pattern 1937 style web equipment belt.

This example is made of 1950s tan webbing.

2.25 57 4.00 102 Reverse" crown over "FKF" over "1957"
This example is from the 1960s and is made of two different shades of tan webbing. 2.125 54 3.875 98 Reverse" crown over "HTK"
This example is from the 1960s and is made of olive green webbing. 2.25 57 4.00 102 Reverse" crown over "HTK"
Belt Frogs— Page 2     Page 3
Return to Bayonet Identification Guide Index
© Ralph E. Cobb 2009 All Rights Reserved

While the USA has not used belt frogs since the 19th Century, belt frogs are still used in much of the world to allow the bayonet to be carried on a soldier’s equipment belt. Today, belt frogs are very collectible in their own right. Anthony Carter was the world's leading expert on frogs until his untimely passing in 2002. In his three-volume work, Bayonet Belt Frogs, Carter documented 589 different frogs. I don't focus on collecting frogs, so don't have very many. However, the following pulls together those that are scattered across the country-specific pages.

The Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines a frog as “a sheath suspended from a belt and supporting a scabbard.” Use of the term dates to 1710–1720, perhaps from Portugal.

Frogs are typically made of leather or canvas webbing. The scabbard’s frog stud often hooks through a hole in the front piece, securely holding the scabbard in place. Some frogs will have a strap and buckle or other fastener to secure the scabbard. Some frogs also have a hilt strap to prevent the bayonet from flailing around and becoming caught during movement.

Bayonet Belt Frogs: Argentina thru Denmark

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