Country Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Description Length Width Markings
   
in. mm. in. mm.
Poland Thumbnail image of MOLLE bayonet frog used with the 6H4 bayonetThumbnail image of MOLLE bayonet frog used with the 6H4 bayonetThumbnail image of MOLLE bayonet frog used with the 6H4 bayonetThumbnail image of MOLLE bayonet frog used with the 6H4 bayonet Brownish/Green nylon web bayonet frog to allow the 6H4 (AKM Type II) bayonet to be carried on modern MOLLE load bearing equipment.

The MOLLE load-bearing system is the western standard, variations of which are used by the USA, Canada (Tactical Vest), Britain, and many other NATO countries. MOLLE = MOdular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment.

Poland has modernized its military equipment significantly since joining NATO in 1999. The 6H4 bayonet is still the standard, used today with the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber karabinek szturmowy wz. 1996 Beryl (assault carbine pattern 1996 Beryllium). Some 300,000 7.62 mm. Kalashnikov AKM assault rifles are still used by reserve forces, for training, and in war emergency stores. This probably influenced Poland’s continued use of the 6H4 bayonet.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

5.25 133 1.125 29 None.
Portugal Web belt frog for carrying the FAL Type A and m/948 bayonets. Will also accommodate the M1904, m/937, and m/938 bayonets.

Based on the British Pattern 1937 frog, the Portuguese design incorporates a glove fastener on the hilt strap.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

6.50 165 1.187 30 Illegible marking on reverse.
Web belt frog for carrying the FAL Type A and m/948 bayonets. Will also accommodate the M1904, m/937, and m/938 bayonets.

This design incorporates a belt hanger that positions the frog at a 45-degree angle. Portugal adopted this concept in the 19th Century, for use by horse cavalry. This modern frog was most likely intended for use by mechanized troops.

The belt hanger measures 5.50 in. (140 mm.) long by 2.25 in. (57 mm.) wide.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

These frogs may have been imported from Brazil, on account of the P.M.S.C. marking (Polícia Militar de Santa Catarina). The Polícia Militar is a Gendarmerie (i.e., a police force with both civil and military roles). Although I suspect this, I have never been able to substantiate that Brazil used the Portuguese m/948 FBP submachine gun, without which there would have been no need for these frogs. Hopefully, further information will come to light to document the meaning of this marking.

4.75 121 1.187 30 Reverse: "P. M. S. C."
Romania Leather belt frog for use with the AKM Type I knife bayonet. Heavy tan leather with hilt strap. The frog wraps around the scabbard’s rubber insulator and fastens with metal thorns.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

7.75 200 1.875 48 None.
Hybrid canvas/leather frog for use with the AKM Type I knife bayonet. Dark Green canvas back, with tan leather front piece and hilt strap.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

7.75 200 2.125 54 None.
South Africa Dark brown leather belt frog for carrying the Pattern 1907 bayonet.

Carter classified this frog as #575.

The rivets are steel, as is the roller type buckle.

7.50 190 2.75 70 None.
Dark brown leather belt frog with the cut away front section for carrying the No. 9 Mk. I bayonet and the South African No. 9 bayonet. The socket faces to the right when carried.

Carter classified this frog as #577.

Constructed with seven domed steel rivets.  Incorporates a steel roller type buckle. According to Carter, these were worn by the South African Police.

7.25 185 2.625 67 None.
Brown leather belt frog with the cut away front for carrying the M1 bayonet. The M1 bayonet was the So. African variant of the FAL Type A bayonet.

Carter classified this frog as #576.

Constructed with seven copper rivets. Incorporates a steel roller type buckle.

7.50 190 2.75 70 None.
Thumbnail image of South African Leather S1 belt frogThumbnail image of South African Leather S1 belt frog Brown leather belt frog for carrying the S1 (Uzi submachine gun) and FAL Type B bayonets.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

This example came on a FAL Type B bayonet I obtained from South Africa.

6.875 175 2.00 51 None.
Web belt pouch with integral frog for carrying the M1 (FAL Type A) bayonet.

According to Carter, Pattern 1961/64 web equipment was the production version of an experimental design, used prior to So. Africa's fielding of the Pattern 1970 web equipment system. Carter classified this pouch/frog as #579.

This example was made in 1962. The identity of the maker represented by "L.B.& D.I.F." is not known. Hopefully further research will bring this to light.

The pouch is made of gray-green webbing, although the exterior of this example been sun-faded to khaki tan. The fittings are made of blackened brass. The pouch measures 8.00 in. (203 mm.) high. The pouch measures 4.00 in. (102 mm.) wide at the top, tapering to 2.00 in. (51 mm.) wide at the bottom.

As the images at left illustrate, the pouch has one straight side and one tapered side. The frog is on the tapered side, with heavy blanket-stitching to reinforce the frog stud opening. This one-side-tapered arrangement resulted in the left and right side pouches not being interchangeable.

8.00 203 4.00
(upper)

2.00
(lower)

102


51

Inside of Cover: "L.B.& D.I.F." over U-arrow and "62"
Olive green web belt frog used with the Pattern 1970 web equipment. Used for carrying the M1, R1, and S1 bayonets.

Carter classified this frog as #582.

The distinctive frog stud opening is heavily overstitched. The frog slips over the equipment belt and is secured with a glove fastener facing the inside of the frog's belt loop. This equipment was used during the 1970s and 1980s.

6.50 165 1.50 38 None.
Sweden Leather belt frog for carrying the M1896 bayonet.

Carter classified this frog as #406.

The "B" marking indicates modification to fit the wider m/59 equipment belt.

There are two sets of unit markings present on the inside of the belt loop.  The first is for the 3rd Trängen (supply & maintenance troop).  The second is for the 28th Infantry Regiment.

9.25 235 2.375 60 "B" on scabbard tab

(crown) over "T. 3" and (crown) over "I. 28" on inside of belt loop.

Dark brown leather belt frog worn by NCO's to carry the Swedish M1896 bayonet.

Carter classified this frog as #400.

11.50 292 4.50 114 None.
Switzerland Leather belt frog for carrying the various Schmidt-Rubin bayonets.  This example came on this M1889 bayonet.

Made in 1917 by Saddler Fritz Pauli, Biberist, Solorthurn Canton, Switzerland.

Carter classified this frog as #410.

7.375 187 3.00 76 Reverse: "Fritz Pauli" over "Sattler" over "Bieberist" all inside an oval, over "17". 

Also "Sch" over Swiss cross, inside a rectangle.

Leather belt frog for carrying the Stgw. 57 bayonet.

Made in 1989 by A. Bucher, Wolhusen.

Carter classified this frog as #588.

7.25 185 2.50 65 Reverse: "A. Bucher" over "8  Wolhusen 9"
Thumbnail image of Swiss belt frogThumbnail image of Swiss belt frogThumbnail image of Swiss belt frog Plastic belt frog introduced in 1990 with the Stgw. 90 bayonet. It is also found with the Stgw. 57 bayonet.

Constructed of plastic reinforced with cloth, using aluminum rivets and an aluminum frog stud.

This undated example was made by the textiles firm of Werner Fasler, Tramstrasse 5, 5034 Suhr.

Carter classified this frog as #589.

 

7.625 194 2.25 57 Reverse: "Fasler 5034 Suhr"
Thumbnail image of Swiss belt frogThumbnail image of Swiss belt frogThumbnail image of Swiss belt frog This example came on the Stgw. 90 bayonet pictured below. Unlike the example above, this example is dated as having been produced in 1991.

The frog was made by the Swiss firm Wechner AG, located in Arth. Wechner was a manufacturer of bags, suitcases, travel items etc., both of leather and imitation leather. The company was dissolved in 1998 and its assets liquidated.

7.625 194 2.25 57 Reverse: "Wechner AG" over "CH-6145 Arth 91"
Turkey Thumbnail image of Turkish leather belt frog for the No. 4 spike bayonetThumbnail image of Turkish leather belt frog for the No. 4 spike bayonetThumbnail image of Turkish leather belt frog for the No. 4 spike bayonet Leather belt frog modified for use with the No. 4 Mk. II bayonet.

This is a typical Turkish leather belt frog used with the M1935 bayonet that has been modified by stitching the front piece to better secure the small, round No. 4 scabbard.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

9.25 235 2.625 67 None.
USA Thumbnail image of U.S. M1868 Sword FrogThumbnail image of U.S. M1868 Sword FrogThumbnail image of U.S. M1868 Sword FrogThumbnail image of U.S. M1868 Sword Frog Leather belt frog for carrying the M1840 Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO) sword. Although not for a bayonet, this frog is so closely patterned after European bayonet frogs, it is sometimes mistaken as such.

This frog was adopted in 1868, when the Ordnance Department decided that leather would no longer be used for sword and bayonet scabbards. From that point forward, blackened steel scabbards were produced for the M1840 NCO sword. The steel scabbard had a frog stud, rather than the sword hanger loops used with the leather scabbard.

This frog was also used to carry the M1840 Bandsman (Musician) Sword until the late 1890's. The bandsman sword was shorter than the M1840 NCO sword and lacked the handguard.

Use of the NCO Sword was curtailed after 1875, being reserved for wear by senior staff NCOs (1st Sgt., Quartermaster Sgt., and Sgt Major) at regimental or general headquarters. As a result, these frogs are uncommon.

This example was produced at Rock Island Arsenal (RIA). RIA started dating items after 1902, so this undated example likely pre-dates 1902. I don’t know how long the M1868 Sword Frog remained in service, but have observed one made at RIA that was dated 1907. A 1917 printing of the Ordnance Department’s publication, Horse Equipments and Equipments for Officers and Enlisted Men, revised July 3, 1908, still shows this frog in use.

The “E.H.S.” marking identifies leather goods inspector, Emil H. Schmitten. According to the Rock Island Armory, Schmitten worked ca.1903–1905. However, the existence of this example demonstrates that he was likely working prior to 1902.
7.00 178 3.125 79 Front:"Rock Island" over "Arsenal"

Rear: "AC" over "E.H.S."

Yugoslavia
Brown leather belt frog for use with the M1948 bayonet.

Carter classified this frog as #423.

8.625 219 1.875 48 "BK" inside a circle, within a stitched inverted triangle.
Brown leather belt frog for use with the M1956 submachine gun bayonet.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

According to my Serbian collector friend, Nebojsa Milanovic, the Cyrillic “BK” inside the stitched triangle stands for Vojna Kontrola (Military Control).  The official nomenclature number indicates that this frog was made in Kragujevac.  He says that unmarked frogs also exist and they were made in a different factory.

7.50 190 1.75 44 "BK" inside a circle, within a stitched inverted triangle.

"S-38-191-9"

Unknown/ Unidentified Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog.Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog.Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog.Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog. Brown leather belt frog that was advertised as Yugoslavian, but does not match known Yugoslavian frog patterns.

The long straight belt loop, triangle stitching, and brass thorn are consistent with known Yugoslavian frogs. However, the placement of the hilt strap and shape of the front piece are not.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

9.75 248 2.00 51 None.
Thumbnail image of unknown/unidentified web belt frogThumbnail image of unknown/unidentified web belt frog Olive green web belt frog that came on this South African FN–FAL Type C bayonet with an early FN-produced steel scabbard.

The frog exhibits characteristics of both the Portuguese Infantry Belt Frog and the South African Pattern 1970 Frog, but is not an exact match to either.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

7.50 191 1.375 35 Reverse: illegible mark
Belt Frogs—     Page 1     Page 2     
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© Ralph E. Cobb 2009 All Rights Reserved

Bayonet Belt Frogs - Portugal thru Yugoslavia

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