Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
M4 Hard Rubber Grip
Bayonet-knife for use on the caliber .30 U.S. Carbine M1. The bayonet-knife M4 was also used on the selective-fire M2 Carbines which were developed post-war.

This is a M4 First Production bayonet that has been modified with a hard rubber grip. This was an experimental attempt to find a grip material more resistant to rot than the leather grip, which did not hold up well in the Pacific Theatre.

It is believed that these modifications were done on Okinawa in the late 1940s or early 1950s. Some of these regripped bayonets saw use in the Korean War.

The scabbard is the earliest M8 scabbard variant, used primarily with the M3 combat knife. Designed and produced by the Beckwith Manufacturing Co.,  this variant has the short web loop and no wire belt hanger.

6.50
165
11.50
292
.590
15.0
Scabbard:  “M8” over “B. M. Co.”
M4 Wooden Grip This is a M4 First Production bayonet that has been modified with a one-piece wooden grip. This was another experimental attempt to find a grip material more resistant to rot than the leather grip, which did not hold up well in the Pacific Theatre.

This example was made by the W. R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co. of Bradford, PA.

It is believed that these modifications were done on Okinawa in the late 1940's or early 1950's, and the bayonets saw use in the Korean War.

An unusual dated example, the scabbard is post-war production made in 1953. M8A1 scabbards made prior to 1955 did not have the metal tip (although the tip and securing grommet; or just the grommet, were sometimes installed on early scabbards during organizational-level maintenance).

6.50 165 11.375 289 .575 14.6 Crosspiece:  "USM4" over "Case"

Pommel:  "Sp" and "43B"

Belt hanger: "M-F-P" over "3-53"

M4 Cast Aluminum Grip This is a M4 First Production bayonet that has been modified with cast aluminum grip scales painted black. The grip scales mimic the second production plastic grips.

These were once thought to have been undocumented experimental pieces. However, in his book, Collecting Bayonets, Jim Maddox confirms that these were a mid-1960s commercial product of a surplus dealer near Warner Robbins, GA. I have also seen an M5 bayonet with a similar cast aluminum grip.

Although not an official variation, the aluminum grips are an interesting curiosity.

 

6.50 165 11.375 289 .590 15.0 Crosspiece: "USM4" over "Case"

Pommel: "Sp" and "43B"

Scabbard: "U.S. M8A1" over "PWH"

M4 Second Production The M4 Second production bayonet resulted from post-war experimentation to address the shortcomings of the original M4. The two most significant differences are the two-piece molded plastic grip scales and the wider crosspiece.Production began in 1954 and continued at least into the late 1960s. Producers included:

—Turner Manufacturing Co.
—Imperial Knife Co.
—Conetta Manufacturing Co,
—Bren-Dan Manufacturing Co.

This example was made by the Bren-Dan Manufacturing Co., Stamford, CT.

According to noted U.S. bayonet authority Gary Cunningham, it is possible that Bren-Dan Co. is somehow related to Conetta Manufacturing Co. Both firms are of Stamford Connecticut. Like the Conetta bayonets,  Bren-Dan M4 bayonets are somewhat of a mystery. No government records have been discovered to identify when these bayonets were made or how many may have been produced.

The scabbard was assembled at the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind, in Philadelphia, PA.

6.75 171 11.75 298 .590 15.0 Crosspiece:  "US M4", "Bren-Dan"

Scabbard:  "U.S. M8A1" over "P W H"

Glove Fastener: "RAD Fastener Co. Prov. RI"
Thumbnail image overall view of commercial M4 bayonet by KiffeThumbnail image of the hit of commercial M4 bayonet by KiffeThumbnail image of maker mark on commercial M4 bayonet by KiffeThumbnail image pommel view of commercial M4 bayonet by KiffeThumbnail image overall view of scabbard for commercial M4 bayonet by KiffeThumbnail image of united-carr mark on scabbard snap fastener M4 Kiffe Patterned after the M4 First Production bayonet, these were once thought to be made during the Korean War era for a military contract. However, no documentation exists to support this theory. Research by noted U.S. Bayonet expert, Gary Cunningham, has demonstrated that they are a commercial product, made during the early 1960's, when the Office of the Director of Civilian Marksmanship (DCM) was selling off surplus M1 Carbines.

Kiffe bayonets vary. The leather grip can be found with either five or six grooves. The length of the blade's false edge varies. The blade and other metal parts are blued. The "Kiffe Japan" marking can be found on the ricasso or crosspiece. This example is of poor construction compared to American military issue bayonets. However, some are of better quality, including a rare variation for use with the Armalite AR10 rifle.

The Japanese firm (or firms) that produced these is not known. The variations suggest that there may have been more than one manufacturer.

Kiffe was founded in 1875 by Herman H. Kiffe as a New York City manufacturer and retailer of sporting goods, especially baseball equipment. The company was renamed several times over their nearly 100 year existence. Examples include:

Herman H. Kiffe Sporting Goods—1875
H. H. Kiffe Company—ca.1900
Lucke-Kiffe Company, Inc.—1930s–1950s
Kiffe Sales Company—1960s

Over the years, Kiffe sold all manner of camping, hunting, and fishing gear; and, military surplus as well. Both M4 and M5 bayonets have been observed with the Kiffe private label. Initially, the new-made bayonets were paired up with military surplus M8A1 scabbards and sold for $2.50. Later, the bayonets were sold with commercial copies of the M8A1 scabbard, some with leather belt hangers.

The scabbard with this example is a pre–1955 U.S. M8A1, made by the Beckwith Manufacturing Co. of Dover, New Hampshire.

The glove fastener was made by the United-Carr Fastener Corporation of Cambridge, Massachusetts. United-Carr was famous for developing the “DOT” fastener (aka Lift-the-Dot) still widely used today. United-Carr was absorbed into TRW Corporation in 1969.

6.625 168 11.50 292 .595 15.1 Ricasso: "Kiffe" over "Japan"

Scabbard (throatpiece): "U.S. M8A1" over "B. M. Co."

Scabbard (body): superimposed "vp" over "6"

Scabbard (Glove Fastener): "United" over "Carr"

Thumbnail image of Sportsworld M4 bayonet-knifeThumbnail image of Sportsworld M4 bayonet-knifeThumbnail image of Sportsworld M4 bayonet-knifeThumbnail image of Sportsworld M4 bayonet-knife M4 Sportsworld Similar to the Kiffe M4 bayonet above, this is another early 1960s commercial M4 bayonet-knife.

Nothing is known about the retailer "Sportsworld." Although much less common than the Kiffe bayonets, these turn up often enough to have been produced in quantity. Construction and finish is very similar to the Kiffe bayonets, leaving open the possibility that they were produced by the same Japanese manufacturer.

6.25 159 11.125 283 .585 14.9 Ricasso: "Sportsworld" over "Japan"
M5 Bayonet-knife for use on the caliber .30–06 U.S. M1 Garand rifle,

The M5 was introduced in 1953 to replace the M1 and M1905E1 bayonets used with the M1 rifle. The M5 mated the blade of the M4 bayonet with a hilt incorporating a novel attachment system. In place of a muzzle ring, the crosspiece had a steel stud that inserted into the M1 rifle's gas cylinder lock screw.

This example was made by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island.

6.625 168 11.375 289 n/a Crosspiece:  "M5" and "Imperial" and Defense Acceptance Stamp (DAS)

Scabbard:  "U.S. M8A1" over "PWH"

M1956 Entrenching Tool Bayonet Carrier Olive green canvas carrier for attaching the entrenching tool to the equipment belt.  Has provision for attaching the M8A1 scabbard to allow carrying of the bayonet as well.

Carrier measures 10.50 in. (267 mm.) long by 7.375 in. (187 mm.) wide.

This example was made in 1967 and is shown here with the US M6 bayonet.

n/a n/a n/a Front: "US"

Reverse:

"Carrier Intrenching Tool
M-1956 Contract No.
DSA-100-67C-0103
FSN-8465-542-5842     16"

M6 Bayonet-knife for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M14 selective-fire rifle, introduced in 1958 to address the shortcomings of the M1.

The M6 was very similar to the M5, but used a conventional muzzle ring.

This example was made in 1964 by the Columbus Milpar and Manufacturing Co., Columbus, OH.  According to noted U.S. bayonet authority Gary Cunningham, Milpar delivered 182,000 M6 bayonets to the U.S. Government in 1964.

6.75 171 11.375 289 .725 18.4 Crosspiece:  "US M6" and "MILPAR COL" and Defense Acceptance Stamp (DAS)

Scabbard:  "USM8A1" over "PWH" and Defense Acceptance Stamp (DAS).

M6 These examples are still sealed in their original boxes. The cardboard box is sealed inside a heavy plastic wrapper. The bayonet is sealed in a foil preservative wrapper inside the box. The wrapped bayonets were packed 50 to a carton.

Although deliveries of new M6 bayonets continued into 1969, these may be repacked items, because I have observed bayonets from both Milpar and Imperial in these packages.

 

n/a n/a n/a Wrapper:

"1005-722-3097
Bayonet-Knife, M-6
1 Ea.
DAAF 03-67-C-0069
A-
10/68"

Mil-K 818C Folding Knife Vietnam-era example of the all-metal four-blade pocket knife issued to U.S. troops from the Second World War to the present day.  Has knife blade; screwdriver/bottle opener; can opener; and awl (punch).

This example was made in 1970 by the Camillus Cutlery Co., Camillus, NY.

Overall length shown at right is of the folded knife and does not include the lanyard loop.  Overall length with knife blade extended is 6.50 in. (165 mm.).

Macrame tassel attached to lanyard loop was a later addition. Macrame was very popular in the USA from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s.

2.50 64 3.75 95 n/a Body:  "U.S."

Blade: "Camillus" over "1970"

Can Opener:  "Can Opener"
Daisy Model 634 Sport Trainer Rubber knife bayonet to go with the Daisy Model 634 non-firing toy drill rifle. The rifle and bayonet are about 3/4 size for young boys.

The Daisy Sport Trainer rifles were made 1966–69 by the Daisy Manufacturing Co. The bayonet was closely patterned after the bayonets used on similar trainer rifles made in the 1950s by the Parris Manufacturing Co. Although not documented, the bayonets and mounting system are so similar, it seems likely that they were made by the same unknown contractor that had produced the Parris bayonets.

No scabbard was produced.

4.625 117 8.00 203 .545 13.8 Ricasso (both sides): "Daisy" with bullseye inside the "D"
Colt "New Model" M7 Bayonet-Knife for use on the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber M16 assault rifle. Also used on some U.S. issue combat shotguns, such as the Remington 870 and the Mossberg 500 and 590.

The first of Colt's M7 bayonets were made 1961–1962 by Universal Industries of West Haven, CT. They had a green plastic grip that resembled the leather M4 bayonet grip of the Second World War. Since the M1 Carbine was still in use, it made more sense that the M7 bayonet use the same black plastic grip parts already adopted for the post-war M4 bayonet.

Colt designated the re-gripped bayonet as the "New Model M7" and assigned it part number 62316 in the Colt inventory. This part number appears on the bayonets commercially made for Colt. The U.S. Government adopted the New Model M7 as the Bayonet-Knife M7, in 1964. More than 4 million M7 bayonets were produced during its more than 30-year service life.

These appeared in 2009, advertised to be new-old-stock 1960s examples. However, it is unclear whether they are 1960s Colt "New Model M7" bayonets or more recent production by an, as of yet, undetermined manufacturer. According to Colt, 30,000 were made by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island in 1963–1964, prior to the US Government issuing its first M7 bayonet contract in May 1964. Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik, in West Germany, also produced private-label M7 bayonets for Colt.

The olive green scabbard body for the Imperial-made Colt bayonet is unique. Unlike other M8A1 scabbards, this scabbard body has a rough crinkle-finish and no metal tip protector.

6.75 171 11.875 302 .880 22.4 Blade: Colt 'rampant horse' logo, followed by "Colt's 62316," Hartford, Conn USA"

Crosspiece: "U.S. M7"

Scabbard: "U.S. M8A1"

Glove Fastener: "RAU CO" (partial)

Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7 M7 Bayonet-Knife M7 U.S. military contract producers included:

—Bauer Ordnance Co.
—Columbus Milpar and Manufacturing Co.
—Conetta Manufacturing Co.
—Fraser Manufacturing Corp.
—General Cutlery Co.
—Imperial Knife Co. (later, Imperial Schrade Corp.)
—Ontario Knife Co.

This U.S. bayonet-knife M7 was made 1980–1984 by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island.  According to noted U.S. bayonet authority Gary Cunningham, Imperial delivered 194,000 M7 bayonets to the U.S. Government in the 1980’s.

The Bayonet-Knife Scabbard M10 was developed in 1987, as the supply of M8A1 scabbards began to run out. The M10 scabbard is made of injection-molded plastic, with an integral nylon web belt hanger. This example is believed to have been produced 1987–88 by the Ontario Knife Co. of Franklinville, New York.

6.75 171 11.875 302 .880 22.4 Crosspiece: "US M7" and  "Imperial"

Scabbard Body (front):  "M10" and "ASSY 8448476" over "MFG 2V376"

Thumbnail image of FZR-marked M7 bayonetThumbnail image of FZR-marked M7 bayonetThumbnail image of FZR-marked M7 bayonetThumbnail image of FZR-marked M7 bayonetThumbnail image of FZR-marked M7 bayonet M7 This M7 example bears the scarce "FZR" maker mark.

These were produced by 1971–73 by Fraser Manufacturing Corp. of Lexington, Michigan. Fraser had hundreds of government contracts and was most well-known for its design and production of vehicle mounts for machine guns. Only two Fraser contracts appear to be associated with the M16 rifle, both of which I believe are for these M7 bayonets. No production data has surfaced. However, based on the dollar amount of the contracts ($99,000) and the value attributed to M7 bayonets provided to foreign governments in 1971–72 (averaged $2.44 each), the number of bayonets produced appears to be in the neighborhood of 40,000, which explains their scarcity.

A family business founded as a maker of fishing reels in Fraser, Michigan, the company fell prey to the onslaught of large sporting goods producers that rose up in the post–WW II period. Fraser adapted by relocating to Lexington in 1950 and eventually becoming a government contractor. At its peak, Fraser employed approximately 100 workers. Fraser operated until 2013, when the owners closed the factory and retired; auctioning off the machinery and donating the building and property to the local school district.
6.625 168 11.625 295 .880 22.4 Crosspiece: "U.S. M7" and "FZR"
Thumbnail image of 1973 U.S. M7 bayonet still in factory wrapperThumbnail image of 1973 U.S. M7 bayonet still in factory wrapperThumbnail image of 1973 U.S. M7 bayonet still in factory wrapperThumbnail image of 1973 U.S. M7 bayonet still in factory wrapper M7 This M7 example is still sealed in its factory wrapping.

A Vietnam War Period example, this is from the second contract let to Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island in 1973.

 

n/a n/a n/a Inside Label:

1005-073-9238
Bayonet Knife, M7
1 EA
DAAF03-73-D-1046-0001
A-12/73

Plastic Wrapper:

DX2   4/73
MIL-B-117-D
TY 1-CL B-ST-2
Quality Packaging
Supply Corp.

1005-07-9238
Bayonet Knife, M7
1 EA
DAAFO3-73-D-1046

M7 Another M7 still sealed in its factory wrapping.

Made in 1989 by the General Cutlery Corporation of Fremont, Ohio. Records at Rock Island Arsenal indicate that General Cutlery delivered 24,400 M7 bayonets during 1989.

In 1998, General Cutlery produced what were intended to be the last M7 bayonets procured by the government, since the M9 bayonet had been in production since 1986. However, the September 11, 2001, attacks caused the government to resume procurement of M7 bayonets in 2003.

n/a n/a n/a Label:

"1005-00-076-9238
FCSM:  19204 P/N  1100077
Bayonet Knife, M7
1 Each
DAAA09-88-C-0366
A     12-88 overwritten by 11-89"

Thumbnail image of M7 bayonet and M10 scabbard in original wrapperThumbnail image of M7 bayonet and M10 scabbard in original wrapper M7 Another example, still sealed in its factory wrapping, contains both the M7 bayonet and a black M10 scabbard.

Made by the Ontario Knife Co., of Franklinville, New York, this example is from contract W52H09-06-D-0068.

 

n/a n/a n/a Label:

"1095-00-017-9701
CAGE: 2V376 P/N 8427025
Bayonet w/Scabbard (M-7)
1 Each
W52H09-06-D-0068/0011
3/09"

Thumbnail Image of U.S. M8A1 Scabbards Produced by the Pennsylvania Working Home for the BlindThumbnail Image of U.S. M8A1 Scabbards Produced by the Pennsylvania Working Home for the BlindThumbnail Image of U.S. M8A1 Scabbards Produced by the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind M8A1 Scabbards Produced by the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind This package contains two M8A1 scabbards assembled at the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind in 1968. They remain in the original sealed carton, never having been opened since leaving the Working Home's shipping department.

The Pennsylvania Working Home for Blind operated from 1874–1979. The Working Home was the prime contractor for assembly of M8A1 scabbards during 1965–70, assembling approximately 4 million scabbards during the Vietnam War years.

The Working Home was a sheltered workshop that provided employment for visually-impaired people. Sheltered schools and workshops were common until social policy was changed to integrate people with disabilities more fully into the community.

The Working Home packaged scabbards two to a box. The web belt hanger was doubled over and secured with a rubber band. The two scabbards were nested together and sealed in a plastic bag, which was placed inside the cardboard box pictured.

The cardboard box was produced in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, a town on the western edge of Philadelphia founded by Welsh settlers in the 1680s.

Read more about the Working Home's production of scabbards in my article: M8A1 Scabbards Produced at the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind.

n/a n/a n/a Label:

1095–508–0339
Scabbard, Bayonet-Knife, M8A1
2 ea.   A/       9/68
DAAF03–67–F–0002

M8A1 scabbard produced by Viz Manufacturing Co.M8A1 scabbard produced by Viz Manufacturing Co.M8A1 scabbard produced by unknown firm represented by the marking "WD"M8A1 scabbard produced by unknown firm represented by the marking "WD"M8A1 scabbard produced by unknown firm represented by the marking "VIZ/WD"M8A1 scabbard produced by unknown firm represented by the marking "VIZ/WD"

Other M8A1 Scabbards M8A1 scabbards were produced by two additional manufacturers other than Beckwith Manufacturing Co. (Victory Plastics) and the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind.

Viz Manufacturing Co. of Philadelphia, PA appears to have been the successor to the Working Home as prime contractor for M8A1 scabbards. However, Viz appears to have only produced scabbards from May 1969 to November 1969, which accounts for their relative scarcity compared to scabbards produced by Beckwith and the Working Home.

Additional scabbards were produced by an unknown firm represented by the marking "WD."

Their marking also appears to have been added to some scabbard throatpieces that had already been marked "VIZ," appearing as "VIZ/WD," with the "WD" being off center due to its having been added later. The steel throatpieces and plastic scabbard bodies on "WD" scabbards often have mold or inspection markings typically associated with Beckwith's Victory Plastics subsidiary, which adds to the mystery surrounding this maker. These dual-marked scabbards are uncommon.

n/a n/a n/a Scabbard (top):  "U.S. M8A1" over "VIZ"

Scabbard (middle):  "U.S. M8A1" over "WD"

Scabbard (middle):  "U.S. M8A1" over "VIZ/WD"

Thumbnail image of M8A1 Scabbard Restraining LaceThumbnail image of M8A1 Scabbard Restraining Lace M8A1 Scabbard Restraining Lace Restraining Lace used with the M8A1 Scabbard.

The "leg-tie" shipped with the M8A1 Scabbard is often thought to be a boot lace. The proper name for it was "Restraining Lace." New scabbards were shipped with the lace attached. Replacement restraining laces were packaged as single laces for this purpose.

The example pictured at left was packaged in November 1970, as U.S. involvement in Vietnam reached its peak.

n/a n/a n/a Label:

"1005-300-5378
Lace, Restraining
1 Ea.
DAAFO1-71-C-0066
A/        11/70"

Thumbnail image of M10 red thread scabbardThumbnail image of M10 red thread scabbardThumbnail image of M10 red thread scabbard Red-Thread M10 Scabbard Rare “red-thread” M10 scabbard, with a single red thread running along the left side of the black nylon belt hanger.

These are believed to have come from a production run of M10 scabbards subcontracted to the General Cutlery Co of Fremont, Ohio, by Lan-Cay in 1998. The production run was for 10,700 scabbards. However, it is unknown how many had the red thread, how the red thread came to be, or why government inspectors accepted these.

n/a n/a n/a Scabbard (throat): "M10"

Scabbard (body): "19204 ASSY 8448476" over "MFG 1Z803"

M9 Bayonet for use on the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M16 assault rifle. Also used on U.S. Army combat shotguns, such as the Remington 870 and the Mossberg 500 and 590.

Adopted in 1986 as the Multipurpose Bayonet System M9, it remains the current-issue US Army bayonet. The M9 is a far more sophisticated bayonet design than the M7 it replaced. The M9's construction is massive in comparison to the lightweight M4–M7 series bayonets.

Manufacturing and design changes were introduced throughout it's production, resulting in a bewildering number of variations.

This example is of the later or "product improved" variant, made in 1999 by Lan-Cay International of Carrollton, Kentucky. Other military contractors include Phrobis III Ltd. and Ontario Knife Co. Commercial versions were produced by Buck and copies were made by many foreign firms.

The belt hanger was developed by Bianchi and is attached/detached via a Fastex connector.

 

7.125 181 12.125 308 .880 22.4 Ricasso (left): "M9" over "Lan-Cay" over "USA"

Scabbard (body): "Lan-Cay"

 

 

Thumbnail image of US M9 Bayonet by Tri-Technologies, Inc.Thumbnail image of US M9 Bayonet by Tri-Technologies, Inc.Thumbnail image of US M9 Bayonet by Tri-Technologies, Inc.Thumbnail image of US M9 Bayonet by Tri-Technologies, Inc.Thumbnail image of US M9 Bayonet by Tri-Technologies, Inc.Thumbnail image of US M9 Bayonet by Tri-Technologies, Inc.Thumbnail image of US M9 Bayonet by Tri-Technologies, Inc. M9 This example was produced by Tri-Technologies, Inc. of Mt. Vernon, New York.

The company was founded in 1996 and manufactures small parts and components for military and commercial equipment.

The existence of M9 bayonets produced by Tri-Technologies was unknown until a few turned up in government surplus auctions in spring 2016.

40,000 are believed to have been manufactured from 2013-2015 pursuant to contract W56HZV-12-C-0327.

06MA8 is Tri-Technologies' Commercial and Government Entity Code (CAGE Code).

7.125 181 12.125 308 .880 22.4 Ricasso (left): "M9" over "06MA8" over "USA"

Scabbard (belt hanger Fastex connector): "ITW Nexus" and mfr date of 2–14

OKC-3S Bayonet-Knife for use on the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M16 assault rifle. Also used on combat shotguns, such as the Remington 870 and the Mossberg 500 and 590.

Adopted in 2002 as the OKC–3S Multipurpose Bayonet/Knife System, it remains the current-issue U.S. Marine Corps bayonet. Designed and manufactured by the Ontario Knife Co. of Franklinville, New York. Production began in 2003.

The OKC–3S has a longer, heavier, more pointed blade than the Army's M9 bayonet. The blade is designed to penetrate body armor, which is increasingly encountered in Iraq and Afghanistan. The blade profile is reminiscent of the U.S.M.C.'s beloved KA–BAR knife. Both the true edge and long false edge are very sharp. The true edge has deep serrations near the ricasso, for cutting rope and heavy materials.

The scabbard has a ceramic honing rod on the reverse. The integral web frog measures 14.00 in. (356 mm.) long by 1.375 in. (35 mm.) wide. It is designed for use with the MOLLE/PALS load-bearing systems used by the USA and many NATO countries. MOLLE = Modular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment. PALS = Pouch Attachment Ladder System.

8.00 203 13.125 333 .880 22.4 Ricasso (left): "Combat" over "U.S.M.C."

Ricasso (right): "OKC 3S" over "Ontario" over "Knife Co."

Grip (left): Eagle, Globe, & Anchor logo

Grip (right): "USMC"

Thumbnail image of U.S. Marine Corps OKC3T Training BayonetThumbnail image of U.S. Marine Corps OKC3T Training BayonetThumbnail image of U.S. Marine Corps OKC3T Training BayonetThumbnail image of U.S. Marine Corps OKC3T Training BayonetThumbnail image of U.S. Marine Corps OKC3T Training BayonetThumbnail image of U.S. Marine Corps OKC3T Training Bayonet OKC3T Training bayonet for use on the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M16 assault rifle. Also used on combat shotguns, such as the Remington 870 and the Mossberg 500 and 590.

Adopted by the U.S. Marine Corps as part of the OKC–3S Multipurpose Bayonet/Knife System, the OKC3T Training Bayonet can be used mounted to the M16 for fencing and dismounted for training in hand-to-hand combat.

Designed and manufactured by the Ontario Knife Co. of Franklinville, New York, the OKC3T is of the same construction as the OKC-3S bayonet above, save for the blue plastic sheathing that encases the blade steel. Consequently, it is the same size and weight as the real thing and will stand up to considerable abuse.

8.00 203 13.25 336 .880 22.4 Blade: "OKC3T Training Bayonet" over "Ontario Knife Company" over "Made in U.S.A."

Thumbnail image of Archangel Ruger 10/22 bayonetThumbnail image of Archangel Ruger 10/22 bayonetThumbnail image of Archangel Ruger 10/22 bayonetThumbnail image of Archangel Ruger 10/22 bayonet

 

Ruger 10/22 Commercial knife bayonet for display use with the .22 LR caliber Ruger 10/22 rifle.

The bayonet is part of the Archangel Manufacturing LLC, 5.56 mm. Advanced Rimfire System kit that alters the rifle into a tactical configuration. The bayonet is intended for display only, however is made of high-strength polymer and has a surprisingly sharp edge and point. Definitely not a child's toy.

Two bayonet variations exist, one patterned after the U.S. M7 and another with a prow or "tanto" point. The bayonet mount fits over the Ruger 10/22 factory barrel and front sight.

6.25 159 11.00 279 .945 24.0 Ricasso; "Archangel"
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USA - Post War Era Bayonets

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