Country Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
   
 
  in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Argentina M1 Carbine Knife bayonet for use with the caliber .30 U.S. Carbine M1. The bayonet is a modified M1891 sword bayonet, formerly used with the 7.65 mm. M1891 Mauser rifle.

Argentina purchased 12,621 M1 Carbines from the USA in 1963. M1 Carbine serial number 3823316 was produced by International Business Machines (IBM).

Modifications to the bayonet included:

—Shortening the blade;
—Replacing the original crosspiece;
—Lengthening the hilt by moving    the crosspiece .375 in. (10 mm.)    farther along the blade;
—Replacing the the original grip    scales; and,
—Grinding a clearance notch in the    pommel.

The grip serrations appear to have been ground after casting, rather than having been molded in to the casting. The grip scales are secured by aluminum rivets that have been ground flush.

This image comparing the hilt to an unmodified M1891 bayonet illustrates the totality of these modifications.

The original scabbard was shortened using the same method as was used in shortening M1879 scabbards for use with the M1891/31 Engineer's Carbine bayonet.

6.50 165 11.00 278 .600 15.2 Ricasso:"3823316"

Spine: Star-A proofmark

Canada CAN Bayonet 2000 Knife bayonet for use with the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber C7A2 (M16) assault rifle.

Adopted by Canada ca. 2004, it has a green grip and scabbard, with black web frog for attachment to MOLLE load bearing equipment. The reverse of the scabbard body has a square, white honing pad, impregnated with diamond or sapphire.

The detachable web frog measures 11.25 in. ( 286 mm.) by 2.375 in. (60 mm.).

The frog is designed for use with the MOLLE load-bearing system used by Canada, the USA, and many other NATO countries. MOLLE = Modular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment.

This example was produced by Eickhorn-Solingen Ltd. in Germany. The quality of materials and standard of manufacture is extremely high, as would be expected from Eickhorn. This design borrows the crosspiece and pommel of the U.S. M7, mating them with a much more substantial and sophisticated blade.

I was told that this example was an overrun from the Canadian contract. However, I have not been able to substantiate that claim, so identification of this example as Canadian is speculative.

7.25 184 12.25 311 .870 22.1 Ricasso (left): "Original" over Eickhorn trademark (squirrel) over "Eickhorn" over "Solingen" and "Made in Germany"

Blade (left): "Bayonet 2005"

Grip Flat (left): "Bayonet 2000" "Pat. Pend."

Grip Flat (right): "Germany" and Eickhorn trademark (squirrel)

Denmark m/75 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber AG3 (Automatgevær 3) assault rifle. The AG3 is a variant of the German G3.

The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet-knife. This example has the 9–O'clock press catch, however, examples may also be found with the 10:30 press catch profile. Three m/75 variations exist:

— The earliest examples had a black 6–groove grip; broad notched crosspiece; and steel pommel.

—A second variant had a 7–groove grip, half-notched crosspiece; and plastic pommel.

— This example is of the third variant, which is identical to the second, except for the narrow plain crosspiece.

Earlier scabbards had the British-style belt fastener, like the m/62 bayonet scabbard. Later scabbards, like this example, had the U.S. M1910-style wire belt hanger.

All Danish m/75 bayonets were made in Germany. This example was made by AES. However, early examples may have been produced by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik, E & F Hörster, or another contractor. The flashguard marking, HMAK, is an abbreviation of Hærens Materiel Kommando (Army Materiel Command). The HMAK marking was used beginning in 1969.

Denmark purchased G3 rifles from Rheinmettal AG in Germany in the mid-1960s, designating them the Gevær m/66. The m/66 had a selector lock that required insertion of a special key to enable full automatic fire. In the mid-1970s, the Danes leased additional G3 rifles from Germany, designating them the Gevær m/75. The m/75 rifles were true selective-fire weapons. These were issued to the regular army and the m/66 rifles relegated to the home guard. The G3 was replaced in regular army service by the Diemaco C7 (M16) in the mid-1990s.

6.75 171 12.25 311 .875 22.2 Flashguard: crown over "HMAK"
France Thumbnail image of French M1956 bayonetThumbnail image of French M1956 bayonetThumbnail image of French M1956 bayonetThumbnail image of French M1956 bayonetThumbnail image of French M1956 bayonet M1956 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.5 mm. M1949/56 self-loading rifle.  This bayonet incorporates a unique dual muzzle ring arrangement. 

This is an early example, made 1956–58, with the blade patterned after the US M4 bayonet-knife. The blade was thought to be too weak due to the long false edge and was redesigned in 1958. According to Kiesling, approximately 40,000 of this early style bayonet were made.

The scabbard body is steel, with an integral leather belt hanger.

"E–RM" stands for Estabilissment Régional du Matérièl.

8.50 216 13.25 337 .875 22.2 Crosspiece: "E-RM"

Scabbard: "E" and "HF" in an oval.

West Germany G3 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber G3 assault rifle. According to noted collector/author Jim Maddox, this was the original G3 bayonet design, dating from 1959; and from which the many subsequent G3 bayonet variants came.

The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet-knife. The black plastic grip has 12 grooves. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position (when viewed from the rear). It has a broad plain crosspiece.

The scabbard is patterned after the U.S. M8A1, but with a woodgrain colored plastic body. The web frog terminates in a belt loop, rather than the M1910 wire hanger typical of U.S. made scabbards.

The G3 rifle had a very long service life in Germany, entering service with the West German Bundeswehr (Federal Armed Forces) in 1959 and serving until adoption of the H & K G36 rifle in 1997.

6.50 165 12.125 308 .870 22.1 None.
G3 A later German G3 bayonet example, which differs from the 1959 design in having the crosspiece notched for a scabbard lock. This design is believed to have originated at Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik AG, prior to the firm's bankruptcy in 1975.

This example has the 12-groove black plastic grip. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position. The blade has a plum hue, which is characteristic of products manufactured by A. Eickhorn GmbH, Solingen (AES), one of the successors to Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik.

The scabbard has a black plastic body with an angular tip. The scabbard incorporates a locking device to secure the bayonet in the scabbard. The scabbard's integral web belt hanger is one inch longer than on the earlier 1959 G3 bayonet design scabbard.

6.50 165 12.00 305 .870 22.1 None.
Indonesia Thumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonetThumbnail image of Indonesian KCB-77 style Brimob bayonet KCB-77 Style Brimob Knife bayonet for use with the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber M16 assault rifle and indigenous 5.56 mm. NATO caliber assault rifles.

A crude copy of the Eickhorn KCB-77, this example has a pommel patterned after the U.S. M4–M7 Series bayonets, rather than the rectangular KCB-style pommel. The L-shaped tab on the lower crosspiece serves as a bottle opener.

The scabbard has an integral black nylon belt frog with a U.S. M1910-style wire belt hanger. The scabbard comes with a plastic cover for the scabbard point, protecting the wire-cutter and screwdriver tip.

Recognized by their dark blue berets, Brimob (Brigade Mobil) is the special operations force of the Indonesian Republic National Police (POLRI). The Brimob is a paramilitary police force whose current mission includes domestic counter-terrorism, law enforcement, and riot control.

Originally a military force, the Brimob's transition to a police organization has been challenging. Used to operating with impunity while Indonesia was under authoritarian rule, Brimob units have been implicated in human rights abuses, especially in East Timor and Papua (New Guinea). The current democratic government has had mixed success at holding Brimob to account and reining-in its use of force when dealing with ordinary citizens.

6.75 171 11.625 295 910 23.1 Blade: Brimob Logo and BRIMOB" over "POLRI"
Italy BM59 AR70 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber BM59 selective-fire rifle and 5.56 mm. NATO Caliber AR70 assault rifle.

The bayonet is closely patterned after the U.S. bayonet-knife M4 . The grip scales are brown plastic. The crosspiece has a unique "hourglass" profile and a large muzzle ring to accommodate the BM59's "tri-compensator" muzzle device. The scabbard is a U.S. M8 clone, with the body made of fiberglass with an olive green gel coat. The belt hanger is made of khaki tan cotton webbing.

Not much is known about the production of these bayonets. The BM59 had a very long service life with the Italian Army, finally being retired in 1990. The Italian Army began using the AR70 in 1979 and it continues in use to the present day.

The BM59 was also used by Indonesia, where it was designated SP.1. Indonesia produced their own bayonet for use with the SP.1.

6.625 168 11.50 292 .870 22.1 Scabbard (belt hanger): "30128"
Norway M/1956 SLK M1894 knife bayonet, made for the Norwegian Krag rifle during the Second World War under German occupation; and subsequently modified for use with the Selvladekarabin (SLK) [U.S. M1 Carbine].

According to noted Scandinavian bayonet authority, Per Holmback, approximately 34,400 M1894 bayonets were made under German occupation during 1943–44.

The USA provided 98,267 M1 & M2 Carbines to Norway between 1950 and 1963 under the Military Assistance Program. A total of 30,000 M1894 bayonets were modified in 1956 at Hærens Våpentekniske Korps (Army weapons technical corps).

The bayonet and M1 Carbine pictured at left was featured in author R.D.C. Evans' Bayonet Fact File No. 50 article in the September/October 2012 issue of The Armourer magazine.

8.25 210 13.00 330 .590 15.0 Ricasso: Crown over K (Kongsberg Vaabenfabrik Tool Stamp)

Press Stud:  21

Scabbard (mouth): 40

M/1957 SLG Second World War German M1884/98 III knife bayonet converted to mount to the Garand Selvladegevær (SLG) [U.S. M1 Garand]. The scabbard was also converted to add a wire belt hanger for use with the U.S. web equipment belt.

The USA provided 72,801 M1 rifles to Norway between 1950 and 1963 under the Military Assistance Program. According to Per Holmback, 5,000 converted bayonets were delivered to the Hærens Våpentekniske Korps (Army Weapons Technical Corps) in April 1957.

A much larger number of scabbards were converted, because German M1884/98 III bayonets were also used with Kar 98k rifles by the Norwegian military forces. The Norwegian railroad still carries Kar 98k rifles in the engineer's compartment of their locomotives for dispatching animals struck on the tracks.

This bayonet and scabbard were originally made by the German firm Carl Eickhorn of Solingen.

9.875 251 15.125 384 n/a Ricasso (Left):  "S/172.G"

Ricasso (Right): "1852" over "d"

Pommel: "WaA 138" twice

Scabbard:  "S/172" over "1940"

AG3 Type 1 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber AG3 (Automatgevær 3) assault rifle. The AG3 is a variant of the German G3.

The Norwegian AG3 Type 1 bayonet differs from the German G3 bayonet in having a 0.5 in. (13 mm.) shorter hilt. The shorter hilt and narrow crosspiece keep the hilt behind the rifle's flash-hider, eliminating the need for a steel flashguard.

The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet-knife. The ungrooved, oval, stippled green plastic grip is unique among G3 bayonets. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position and lacks the serrations found on other G3 bayonets. It has a plain narrow crosspiece.

The scabbard is patterned after the U.S. M8A1. Early examples had a woodgrain colored plastic body with a metal tip protector. This example is a later type, with a green plastic body and large leg-tie hole characteristic of A. Eickhorn GmbH, Solingen (AES) production.

The earliest examples were made by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik in Germany. Subsequent production was at Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk (Kongsberg Weapons Factory), initially, by rehilting M4 bayonet blades. Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk later produced bayonets with new-made blades. This example is likely an Eickhorn, as it does not bear theKongsberg factory stamp.

The AG3 rifle entered Norwegian Army (Hæren) service in 1967, with 250,000 made at Kongsberg Våpenfabrikk by the time production ceased in 1974. The AG3 was phased out of army service following adoption of the HK416 rifle in 2007, but is still used by Home Guard (Heimevernet) units.

In 2009, British bayonet historian R.D.C. Evans published an excellent and comprehensive article on G3 bayonets that is available for download at no cost.

Go to the G3 Bayonets Page

6.625 168 11.50 292 .880 22.4 None.
Thumbnail image of Norwegian AG3 Type 2 bayonet AG3 Type 2 The AG3 Type 2 differs from the earlier AG3 Type 1 bayonet, in that it has the standard-length hilt and flashguard common to most G3 bayonets.

The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet-knife and has a plum hue. It has a 7-groove olive green plastic grip with an integral pommel. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position. It has a half-notched crosspiece, although the scabbard does not have the locking device.

The scabbard is patterned after the U.S. M8A1, with a green plastic body and large leg-tie hole. This example still has the boot-lace leg tie.

The Norwegian AG3 Type 2 bayonets were produced in the 1990s by AES in Germany as replacements.

Go to the G3 Bayonets Page

6.625 168 12.00 305 .870 22.1 None.
Portugal AR-10 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber Armalite AR10 assault rifle produced, in 1960, for Portugal by Artillerie Inrichtingen in the Netherlands.

Unlike most modern bayonets, which mount below the rifle’s barrel, this bayonet mounts inverted above the barrel (a feature later copied on bayonets for the German G3 assault rifle). The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet. The one-piece wooden grip is unique and wraps almost completely around the hilt. The only marking is the triangular Artillerie Inrichtingen trademark. The scabbard is closely patterned after the familiar U.S. M8A1 scabbard.

I corresponded with the Dutch Army Museum, regarding production of the AR10 bayonet. Only 1,556 AR10 rifles and bayonets were delivered to Portugal. A few more were produced for use in Dutch Army trials, bringing total production of this bayonet to approximately 1,600 pieces.

Low production numbers and extensive combat service have made surviving specimens of this bayonet scarce. 

The AR10 saw nearly two decades of combat service with Portuguese special forces fighting insurgents in Angola and Mozambique. See my presentation, The Portuguese AR10 Bayonet, for more information and pictures of the AR10 bayonet in use by Portuguese troops in Angola and Mozambique.

The first AR10 rifles produced by Artillerie Inrichtingen went to Sudan in 1958. These used a German-made knife bayonet that mounted underneath the barrel.

7.125 181 11.75 298 .855 21.7 Ricasso: Superimposed "AI" inside a triangle.

Scabbard: "7446"

Sweden Thumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by BahcoThumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by BahcoThumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by BahcoThumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by BahcoThumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by BahcoThumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by BahcoThumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by BahcoThumbnail image of Swedish m1965 bayonet made by Bahco m/1965 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber AK4 (Automatkarbin 4) assault rifle. The AK4 is a variant of the German G3A3.

This example was made by AB Bahco inEnköping. It has the 6-groove black plastic grip and broad-notched crosspiece. The press catch is at the 1:30 position. The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet-knife and very finely made, being left in the white. The Bahco trademark is applied using an electropencil.

The scabbard has a black plastic body with an angular tip. The scabbard incorporates a locking device to secure the bayonet in the scabbard. The belt hanger is made of nylon webbing.

A second procurement of the m/1965 bayonet occurred in 1976, from Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik AG of Solingen, West Germany. This must have been one of the final contracts fulfilled by Eickhorn prior to its bankruptcy.

AB is an abbreviation for Aktiebolag, which is the equivalent of Corporation in the USA. Bahco is an acronym for "Bernt August Hjort & Co.," the firm's original name. Bahco is a manufacturer of hand tools, established in 1886. The firm's founder, Johan Petter Johansson, invented the plumber's wrench in 1888 and the adjustable wrench (i.e., crescent wrench) in 1891, both of which are still widely used today. Bahco is still in business, having been purchased by Snap-On Inc. in 1999.

Beginning in 1966, Sweden produced the G3A3 under license by the national defence organization, Förenade Fabriksverken (FFV), atCarl Gustafs Stads Gevärsfabrik and Husqvarna Vapenfabrik.

Go to the G3 Bayonets Page

6.50 165 12.00 305 .870 22.1 Blade: Bahco trademark and "422 6 8 016"

Flashguard: 3 Crowns property mark

M4 thru M7 Series Bayonets—    Page 1    Page 2    Page 3
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© Ralph E. Cobb 2011 All Rights Reserved

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