West Germany

Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
     
in.
mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Thumbnail image of Rheinmetall G3 bayonetThumbnail image of Rheinmetall G3 bayonetThumbnail image of Rheinmetall G3 bayonetThumbnail image of Rheinmetall G3 bayonetThumbnail image of Rheinmetall G3 bayonetThumbnail image of Rheinmetall G3 bayonet Rheinmetall G3 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber G3 assault rifle.

This is the bayonet designed by Rheinmetall AG of Dusseldorf when they began G3 production in 1959. The bayonets were manufactured by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik AG of Solingen. This example carries both the Eickhorn squirrel and Rheinmetall diamond-circle trademarks on the ricasso. This example also has a serial number on the flashguard, indicating that it was actually issued.

The Rheinmetall G3 bayonet differs from the more common H & K G3 bayonet in having a bright, double-edged blade that is 2.875 in. (73 mm.) longer. The red-brown plastic grip has 6 deep grooves. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position (when viewed from the rear). It has a broad plain crosspiece secured by two domed rivets.

The scabbard is patterned after the U.S. M8A1, but with a woodgrain colored plastic body. The web frog terminates in a belt loop. The hit strap is missing on this example.

The person from whom I obtained this example indicated that he had purchased it in Thailand many years ago. The West German government granted Burma a license to manufacture the G3 in 1960, in a move to forestall Burma aligning with communist East Germany. In advance of their beginning domestic production, Burma received 10,000 G3 rifles from Germany in 1961 and another 12,000 from Rheinmetall in 1962. I suspect that this bayonet was associated with one of the 1961-62 G3 shipments to Burma and later made its way across the border into Thailand.

In 2009, British bayonet historian R.D.C. Evans published an excellent and comprehensive article on G3 bayonets that is available for download at no cost.

G3 and CETME Bayonets Page

9.375 238 14.375 365 .870 22.1 Ricasso: diamond-in-circle and squirrel

Flashguard: "07704"

Thumbnail image of German G3 bayonetThumbnail image of German G3 bayonetThumbnail image of German G3 bayonetThumbnail image of German G3 bayonet H & K G3 This G3 bayonet was H & K's design, dating from 1959 when H & K began producing G3 rifles.

H & K's G3 bayonet was widely adopted and became the standard G3 bayonet used by the German Bundeswehr (Federal Armed Forces).

The blade is patterned after the U.S. M4 bayonet-knife. The black plastic grip has 12 grooves. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position. It has a broad plain crosspiece.

The scabbard is patterned after the U.S. M8A1, but with a woodgrain colored plastic body. The web frog terminates in a belt loop, rather than the M1910 wire hanger typical of U.S. made scabbards.

The G3 rifle had a very long service life in Germany, entering service with the West German Bundeswehr in 1959 and serving until adoption of the H & K G36 rifle in 1997.

G3 and CETME Bayonets Page

6.50 165 12.125 308 .870 22.1 None.
Thumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced by Carl Eickhorn for use with the G3 rifleThumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced by Carl Eickhorn for use with the G3 rifleThumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced by Carl Eickhorn for use with the G3 rifleThumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced by Carl Eickhorn for use with the G3 rifleThumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced by Carl Eickhorn for use with the G3 rifle M7 An unusual variation of the U.S. M7 bayonet-knife, with no lower crosspiece. This was done to allow use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber G3 assault rifle, in addition to the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M16.  On the G3, the bayonet is fixed inverted, above the barrel, and the typical M7 lower crosspiece would block the sight picture if not eliminated.

According author/researcher, the late M.H. Cole, a letter from Colt, dated February 2, 1979, indicated these M7 bayonets with the abbreviated crosspiece were the first M7 production by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik AG of Solingen, manufactured 1975/76 under license from Colt. Carl Eickhorn's total 1970s production of Colt M7 bayonets was approximately 80,000, only a portion of which had the abbreviated crosspiece, making this a fairly scarce piece.

The scabbard pictured at left is a 1990s vintage AES scabbard. The original scabbard for the 1975/76 Colt-contract M7 bayonet, would have been similar to the scabbard pictured with the M7 bayonet below, except the scabbard throat would have been marked "U.S. M8A1" and the webbing would have included the U.S. M1910 wire belt hanger.

6.50 165 11.50 292 .880 22.4

 

Blade: Colt  'rampant horse' logo, followed by "Colt's 62316," Hartford, Conn USA", Made in W. Germany."

Crosspiece:  "US M7"

Scabbard:  "U.S. M8A1" over "Made in W. Germany"

Image of west german g3 bayonetImage of west german g3 bayonetImage of west german g3 bayonetImage of west german g3 bayonet G3 This G3 example was made by Gesellschaft für Metallverarbeitung mbH & Co. (GMS) [in English, Society for Metalworking L.L.C.]. GMS purchased the Carl Eickhorn factory and squirrel trademark following Eickhorn's bankruptcy in 1975.

GMS introduced a larger 20 mm. pommel for its G3 products. This innovation eliminated the need to install an adapter to the G3 rifle, in order to mount a bayonet. The GMS bayonet has a 12-groove black plastic grip that is more roughly-textured than the Eickhorn bayonets. The press catch is at the 4:30 position. It has a broad plain crosspiece.

The scabbard has a black plastic body with an angular tip. This scabbard design is believed to have originated at Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik AG, prior to the firm's bankruptcy. This example lacks the locking device to retain the bayonet. The scabbard's integral web belt hanger is made of black nylon.

The plain crosspiece and lack of a locking device; and the nylon belt hanger suggest that this example was likely made for commercial sale rather than military use. GMS went bankrupt in 1981, so this example would date from 1976–81.

G3 and CETME Bayonets Page

6.50 165 11.875 302 .870 22.1 None.
Thumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMSThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet produced by GMS KCB–77 M1 Knife bayonet for use with the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber M16 assault rifle. This example was manufactured by GMS.

The KCB–77 series are an improvement of the KCB–70 bayonet, which was designed in the late 1960s by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik and the Netherlands firm NWM (Nederlandsche Wapen-en Munitiefabriek) for the Stoner 63A weapons system.

GMS changed the plastic formula and made the grip more robust in order to remedy cracking problems encountered with the plastic used for the KCB–70 bayonet. GMS also developed their own wire-cutter scabbard design, since the Eickhorn family held the KCB–70 wire-cutter patent. The GMS wire cutter assembly is tubular and entirely surrounds the plastic scabbard body, where the Eickhorn design is a flat plate that attaches to the side of the plastic scabbard body. GMS produced a more elaborate belt hanger, which included the U.S. M1910 style wire loop, but also allowed attachment to a plain belt.

In addition to the KCB–77 M1, GMS also produced a KCB–77 M3 variant for use with the 7.62 mm. G3 assault rifle. The GMS product had the G3 bayonet adapter built in to the pommel, similar to the GMS G3 bayonet pictured above.

 

6.875 175 11.75 298 .870 22.1 Ricasso: Squirrel trademark

Crosspiece (face): "1005–9110" and "AT 783884"

Thumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet with AES hexagons trademarkThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet with AES hexagons trademarkThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet with AES hexagons trademarkThumbnail image of KCB-77 bayonet with AES hexagons trademark KCB–77 M1 This KCB-77 example was manufactured by A. Eickhorn GmbH, Solingen (AES).

Shortly after Eickhorn's 1975 bankruptcy, members of the Eickhorn family formed a new firm, A. Eickhorn GmbH & Co. für Schneidwaren und Waffen KG (AES) [in English, A. Eickhorn Company for Cutlery and Weapons L.L.C.].

Because GMS owned the squirrel trademark, AES developed the generic trademark shown on this bayonet:  three hexagons containing the letters “A,” “E,” and “S.”

When GMS went bankrupt in 1981, the squirrel trademark and other GMS stock were acquired by E & F Hörster GmbH & Co. AES obtained a license to use the squirrel trademark on bayonets and combat knives from Hörster ca. 1982–83. The 1984 AES catalog shows both the hexagon and squirrel trademarks. This bayonet is shown on page 3 at bottom left. Following Hörster’s bankruptcy in 1996, AES re-acquired exclusive rights to the squirrel trademark.

6.875 175 11.75 298 .870 22.1 Ricasso: Letters AES, each inside a hexagon.
Thumbnail image of German G3 bayonetThumbnail image of German G3 bayonetThumbnail image of German G3 bayonetThumbnail image of German G3 bayonetThumbnail image of German G3 bayonet G3 This G3 example has the 12-groove black plastic grip, similar to the 1959 design. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position. It has a broad notched crosspiece.

Although unmarked, the blade has a plum hue, which is characteristic of products manufactured by AES.

The scabbard has a black plastic body with an angular tip. The scabbard incorporates a locking device to secure the bayonet in the scabbard. The scabbard's integral web belt hanger is one inch longer than on the earlier 1959 design scabbard.

G3 and CETME Bayonets Page

6.50 165 12.00 305 .870 22.1 None.
Thumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced in GermanyThumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced in GermanyThumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced in GermanyThumbnail image of M7 bayonet produced in Germany M7 It is unclear who made this M7 bayonet. However, it was most likely made by AES, owing to the one-piece grip design (which appeared on AES production in the early 1980s); and, the scabbard's similarity to those previously made by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik and those encountered on Hatian-contract bayonets known to have been produced by AES in 1985–86.

The 1984 AES catalog shows the M7 bayonet with a one-piece grip at center left on page 1.

The scabbard on this example is unmarked.

AES made M7 bayonets for many countries, including Indonesia. The absence of a US M1910-style wire belt hanger indicates this example was made for wear on a plain belt. Hopefully, further research will reveal which country used this example.

6.50 165 11.75 298 .880 22.4 Crosspiece (front face): ""Solingen" and "US M7" and "W. Germany"
            Top

East Germany

Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
AK47 Knife bayonet for use with the 7.62 mm. Kalashnikov AK47 assault rifle.

A copy of the Russian 6X2 bayonet, the East German AK47 bayonet is distinguished by the black plastic grip scales, electropencil serial number on the crosspiece, and gray web belt hanger with a glove fastener.

The reason for the unusual grip and second partial muzzle ring was that the bayonet was an afterthought, the AK47 not being initially designed to accept a bayonet.

AK Bayonets Page

7.875 200 12.25 311 .695 17.7 Crosspiece:  "Y7451"

Snap on frog strap: "W U K"
AKM Type I Knife bayonet for use with the 7.62 mm. Kalashnikov AKM assault rifle.

A copy of the Russian 6X3 bayonet, the East German bayonet has black plastic grip.  Black steel Type I scabbard with a black rubber insulator. Gray leather belt hanger and gray web retention strap. The leather belt hanger is 3.75 in. (95 mm.) long.

East Germany produced the Type I bayonet from 1965–1978. This example has seen considerable service.

AK Bayonets Page

 

5.875 149 11.00 279 .695 17.7 Crosspiece (left): "Z3486" (electro-engraved)

Crosspiece (right): "K100" (inside a rectangle)

Mortise: "0722" (electro-engraved)

Scabbard (insulator): "5996"

AKM Type I Transitional Knife bayonet for use with the 7.62 mm. Kalashnikov AKM assault rifle.

This AKM variant represents a transition between the AKM Type I and Type II bayonets, mating the Type I bayonet with the Type II scabbard. Only East Germany and Russia did so. The AKM Type I Transitional was produced by East Germany from 1979–1985.

The leather belt hanger on early Type II scabbards is 3.625 in. (92 mm.) long.

AK Bayonets Page

5.875 149 11.00 279 .695 17.7 Crosspiece:  "K"

Mortise: "178046" electro-engraved

Scabbard (body): "1  1946/2"

Scabbard (metal end):  "046" electro-engraved
AKM Type II Knife bayonet for use with the Kalashnikov 7.62 mm. AKM and 5.45 mm. AK74 assault rifles.

East Germany produced the Type II bayonet from 1985–1987, when the AK74 bayonet was to be introduced. This never occurred, due to east-west reunification. The orange grip AKM Type II is believed to be the initial East German production and is more finely finished than the later black grip bayonets.

Gray web retention strap. The leather belt hanger on late Type II scabbards is 4.75 in. (122 mm.) long, noticeably longer than the belt hanger used on Type I and Type I Transitional scabbards.

AK Bayonets Page

5.75 146 10.50 267 .695 17.7 Grip (left): "225690" electro-engraved

Crosspiece (right): inspection mark

Scabbard (body): "225690" electro-engraved and "1 1946/4"

Scabbard (metal end): inspection mark

AKM Type II This example is of the later black grip AKM Type II. The blade exhibits arced tool marks common to East German bayonets in the last years before reunification.

AK Bayonets Page

5.75 146 10.625 270 .695 17.7 Grip (left): "410809" electro-engraved

Grip (barrel channel): "K" and "2" in a circle.

Scabbard (body): "410809" electro-engraved and "1 1946/5"

Scabbard (metal end): "A"
Thumbnail image of East German replacement AKM bayonet scabbardThumbnail image of East German replacement AKM bayonet scabbardThumbnail image of East German replacement AKM bayonet scabbard AKM Replacement Scabbard AKM replacement scabbard in original packaging.

In English, the label would read something like: “Plastic Sheath and Coupling, 1 Each, Packed: March 1981."

The belt hanger on this example is the early 3.625 in. (92 mm.) long variant used with the AKM Type I and Transitional bayonets. This is consistent with the packing date on the label. The longer 4.75 in. (122 mm.) belt hanger came in with the AKM Type II bayonet ca. 1985.

The leather hanger is liberally dusted in talcum powder to protect against mildew.

n/a n/a n/a Label:

“106-930-000

Scheide kpl. Plast
1 Stück

Gepackt:” and “81,3” inside a square

            Top

Unified Germany

Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Thumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonetThumbnail image of German G36 bayonet
G36 Knife bayonet for use with the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber G36 assault rifle. This example is unissued in its cardboard packaging.

The G36 bayonet was created in 1996 to make use of the large stocks of former East German AKM Type II bayonets. The original muzzle-ring was cut away and a new, large diameter muzzle ring welded in place. The original leather belt hanger was replaced by a complex web and plastic belt hanger designed to fit the West German load bearing equipment.

The plastic belt attachment piece was made by YKK Stocko Fasteners GMBH, Kirchhofstraße 52, 42327 Wuppertal.

The belt hanger measures 6.375 in.(162 mm.) long by 2.00 in. (51 mm.) wide.

AK Bayonets Page

5.75
146 10.625 270 .870 22.1 Grip: "427239" in electropencil

Scabbard (body): "427239" and "2" and "1946/5"

Belt Hanger (visible side): "STOCKO" over "Fasteners" and "VV 1774004"

Belt Hanger (hidden side): ">PA 66<"

KCB–77 M1/L Long variant of the KCB–77 M1 knife bayonet produced by AES. This bayonet will mount to the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M16 assault rifle.

The blade finish has a plum hue, common to later AES production. The scabbard measures 16.75 in. (425 mm.) long, including the integral belt hanger. The scabbard body is plastic, with a metal throat and Eickhorn-patent wire cutter assembly. The integral web belt hanger and tie thong are patterned after the US M8A1 scabbard.

AES produced several variants of the KCB–77 bayonet, beginning in the early-mid 1980s. The KCB–77 "family" subtypes were as follows:

M1 was for the M16
M2 was for the FN–FAL
M3 was for the G3
M4 was for the U.S. M1 Carbine
M5 was for the S.I.G. assault rifles
M6 was for the Mauser 98
M7 was for the AKM

Unlike the standard-length KCB–77 M1, the long variant does not bear the Eickhorn squirrel trademark. The only markings on this example are temporary export marks "Germany" on the ricasso and scabbard throat, in white paint, indicating that this example was produced following reunification in 1989. These marks disappear almost immediately in handling. This example still has the export mark on the scabbard.

This long-blade variant is attributed by some sources as intended for use on the Israeli 5.56 mm. NATO caliber Galil assault rifle, but this has never been substantiated. The USA provided Israel large quantities of the M16 assault rifle, which influenced Israel to limit production of the Galil and use the M16 rifle and M7 bayonet instead. Consequently, few of the long-blade KCB–77 M1/L bayonet were sold.

AES went bankrupt in 2004. The British firm Lightweight Body Armour Ltd. (LBA) bought the AES factory in Solingen and the squirrel trademark, rebranding the edged weapons manufacturing as Eickhorn–Solingen Ltd. LBA International remains the owner of the famous Eickhorn squirrel trademark. They continued production of the KCB–77 M1 bayonet, however, concentrated most of their efforts on the more advanced Bayonet System 2005 they inherited from AES.

9.875 251 14.875 378 .880 22.4 Scabbard: "Germany"
Thumbnail image of G3 knife bayonetThumbnail image of G3 knife bayonetThumbnail image of G3 knife bayonetThumbnail image of G3 knife bayonetThumbnail image of G3 knife bayonet G3 This example has the 7–groove black plastic grip with integral pommel. The press catch is at the 9 O'clock position. It has a half-notched crosspiece.

The blade has a plum hue, which is characteristic of products manufactured by A. Eickhorn GmbH, Solingen (AES).

This example has export markings "Solingen Germany" on the scabbard body, suggesting that it was produced following reunification in 1989, but before AES' bankruptcy in 2004.

The scabbard has a black plastic body with an angular tip. The scabbard incorporates a locking device to secure the bayonet in the scabbard.

G3 and CETME Bayonets Page

6.50 165 11.875 302 .870 22.1 Scabbard (body): "Solingen" over "Germany"
Thumbnail image of FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of FAL Type C bayonet FAL Type C Socket bayonet for the FN–FAL assault rifles that incorporated the 22 mm. NATO-spec flash hider.

Like the two preceding bayonets, this example was made by AES following reunification in 1989, but before AES' bankruptcy in 2004.

AES constructed the bayonet by forging upper and lower halves using a drop hammer. Hot metal was poured in between the halves, to make the complete blank, which was machined to create the tubular socket. The sprue line is evident in the pictures at left.

The scabbard body is plastic, with an integral web belt hanger. The hilt strap's stippled glove fastener is characteristic of AES products.

Most Belgian FAL Type C bayonets had a drawn socket, although FN also used casting near the end of FAL production. These images of the FN (top) and AES (bottom) show differences that distinguish the two makers' production.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.50 165 11.375 289 .890 23.6 Ricasso: "Solingen" over "Germany"

Scabbard (body): "Solingen" over "Germany"

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© Ralph E. Cobb 2009 All Rights Reserved             Top
East Germany

Post-War German Bayonets

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