Country Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
   
 
  in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
USA M5 Bayonet-knife for use on the caliber .30–06 U.S. M1 Garand rifle,

The M5 was introduced in 1953 to replace the M1 and M1905E1 bayonets used with the M1 rifle. The M5 mated the blade of the M4 bayonet with a hilt incorporating a novel attachment system. In place of a muzzle ring, the crosspiece had a steel stud that inserted into the M1 rifle's gas cylinder lock screw.

The M5A1 incorporated an improved press catch design. M5 producers included:

—Aerial Cutlery Co.
—Jones & Dickinson Tool Co.
—Imperial Knife Co.
—Utica Cutlery Co.

This example was made by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island.

The M5 bayonet used the same M8A1 scabbard used with the M4.

6.625 168 11.375 289 n/a Crosspiece:  "M5" and "Imperial" and Defense Acceptance Stamp (DAS)
Denmark m/62 Bayonet-knife used as a field knife by Denmark. Although it would mount to the Second World War M1 Garand rifles provided to Denmark in 1950, it was typically not used as such. The Danish designation for the M1 Garand rifle was Gevær m/50.

The m/62 is a copy of the U.S. M5A1 bayonet, adopted by Denmark in 1962. Where these bayonet were produced has not been established. The likelihood is that they were made in Germany (perhaps by E & F Hörster). It is believed that approximately 33,000 m/62 bayonets were procured by Denmark.

The scabbard is a copy of the US M8A1, except for the woodgrain colored plastic and British-style belt fastener.

HTK is an abbreviation of Hærens Tekniske Korps (Army Technical Corps). This marking was used 1960–69.

6.625 168 11.25 286 n/a Pommel: Crown over "HTK" over "M/62"

Scabbard:  Crown over "HTK"

Haiti M5A1 Bayonet-knife for use on the caliber .30–06 U.S. M1 Garand rifle,

This bayonet was produced by A. Eickhorn-Solingen, GMBH in West Germany for the government of Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier of Haiti. It is believed that a few M5A1 and M6 bayonets were produced in 1985–86, but deliveries had not began by February 1986, when Duvalier went into exile. Eickhorn stopped production and sold the few they had already produced on the commercial market.

These bayonets are very well made, exhibiting a level of fit and finish not found on U.S.-made examples. The blade has the characteristic Eickhorn plum-colored finish and the unique Haitian unit serial number. The grip is secured with phillips-head screws.

The scabbard differs from the U.S. version in that the lower is made of molded plastic without a metal tip protector. Note how large the tie hole in the tip is, compared to a U.S.-made M8A1 scabbard.

6.50 165 11.25 286 n/a Blade: "01225-S"

Crosspiece: "US  M5A1"

Scabbard: "U.S. M8A1"

South Korea K-M5A1 Bayonet-knife for use on the caliber .30–06 M1 Garand rifle.

A clone of the U.S. M5A1 bayonet, but not as well made. The grip scales on these are much thinner plastic than on the U.S. version and more prone to cracking.

The scabbard is a clone of the USA M8A1.

6.50 165 11.125 283 n/a Crosspiece: "K–M5A1" and "DYW" and 'figure–8' symbol

Scabbard: "K–M8A1" and winged anchor & star logo on reverse.

USA M6 Bayonet-knife for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M14 selective-fire rifle, introduced in 1958 to address the shortcomings of the U.S. M1 rifle.

The M6 was very similar to the M5, but used a conventional muzzle ring. M6 producers included:

—Aerial Cutlery Co.
—Imperial Knife Co.
—Columbus Milpar and    Manufacturing Co.
—Unknown producer (marked "AN")

This example was made in 1964 by the Columbus Milpar and Manufacturing Co., Columbus, OH.  According to noted U.S. bayonet authority Gary Cunningham, Milpar delivered 182,000 M6 bayonets to the U.S. Government in 1964.

The M6 bayonet used the same M8A1 scabbard used with the M4 and M5.

6.75 171 11.375 289 .725 18.4 Crosspiece:  "US M6" and "MILPAR COL" and Defense Acceptance Stamp (DAS)

Scabbard:  "USM8A1" over "PWH" and Defense Acceptance Stamp (DAS).

M6 This example is still sealed in it's original box. The cardboard box is sealed inside a heavy plastic wrapper. The wrapped bayonets were packed 50 to a carton.

These must be repacked items, because I have observed bayonets produced by both Milpar and Imperial in these packages.

n/a n/a n/a Wrapper: "1005-722-3097" over "Bayonet-Knife, M-6" over "1 Ea." over "DAAF 03-67-C-0069" over "A-" over  "10/68"
Haiti M6 Bayonet-knife for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M14 selective-fire rifle.

The history and construction are as described for the Hatian M5A1 bayonet above.

The blade marking, F A D'H, is an abbreviation for Forces Armées d'Haiti. The scabbard markings are different than on the M5A1, above, and the tie string is present.

6.50 165 11.25 286 .725 18.4 Blade: "2552 - F A D'H"

Crosspiece: "US M6"

Scabbard: "U.S. M8A1" over "Made in W. Germany"

Unknown Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbineThumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbineThumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbineThumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbineThumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbineThumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbineThumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbineThumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-knife M6 modified for M1 carbine M6 Modified U.S. Bayonet-Knife M6 modified to mount to the caliber .30 U.S. Carbine M1.

The crosspiece is modified by grinding the lower portion of the M6 crosspiece to a width comparable to the Second World War M4 Bayonet-Knife crosspiece. The larger M6 muzzle-ring was cut off, then a crude, smaller muzzle-ring welded in place. Finally, a filler plate was added to position the crosspiece further forward of the grip. The upper pommel has also been milled away to provide clearance for the M1 Carbine's longer bayonet lug.

The modifications evidence crude hand work, suggesting these were done by a country that lacked modern production facilities. Most likely an Asian country. Burma, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand all received M1 Carbines in quantity through the Military Assistance Program (MAP). However, none have similarly received M14 rifles, so the presence of M6 bayonets is not explained. Vietnam would undoubtedly have come into possession of both M1 Carbines and M14 rifles and bayonets post-1975. While Vietnam is clearly capable of better work than this, perhaps, they transferred M6 bayonets to a neighboring country like Cambodia, Laos, or Thailand. Hopefully, further research will lead to clarification regarding which country modified these bayonets.

Although the original maker marking is gone, the Defence Acceptance Stamp (DAS) is still present. The DAS is oriented with the stars toward the blade, which was done by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island.

The U.S. M8A1 scabbard is maker-marked "TWB." The identity of this maker is not known. Some collectors have speculated that this may signify "The Working Blind," however, this has never been substantiated.

6.125 156 11.125 283 .610 15.5 Crosspiece: Defense Acceptance Stamp

Scabbard: "U.S. M8A1" over "TWB"

USA Colt "New Model" M7 Bayonet-Knife for use on the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber U.S. M16 assault rifle. The M7 bayonet was also used on some U.S.-issue combat shotguns, such as the Remington 870 and the Mossberg 500 and 590.

The first of Colt's M7 bayonets were made 1961–1962 by Universal Industries of West Haven, CT. They had a green plastic grip that resembled the leather M4 bayonet grip of the Second World War. Since the M–1 Carbine was still in use, it made more sense that the M7 bayonet use the same black plastic grip parts already adopted for the post-war M4 bayonet.

Colt designated the redesigned bayonet as the "New Model" M7 and assigned it part number 62316 in the Colt inventory. This part number appears on the bayonets commercially made for Colt. The U.S. Government adopted the "New Model" M7 as the Bayonet-Knife M7 in 1964. More than 4 million M7 bayonets were produced during its more than 30-year service life.

This is one of the Colt "New Model" M7 bayonets. According to Colt, 30,000 were made by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island in 1963–1964, prior to the U.S. Government issuing its first M7 bayonet contract in May 1964. Carl Eickhorn, in West Germany, also produced private-label M7 bayonets for Colt.

The olive green scabbard body for the Imperial-made Colt New Model bayonet is unique. Unlike other M8A1 scabbards, this scabbard body has a rough crinkle-finish and no metal tip protector.

6.75 171 11.875 302 .880 22.4 Blade: Colt 'rampant horse' logo, followed by "Colt's 62316," Hartford, Conn USA"

Crosspiece: "U.S. M7"

Scabbard: "U.S. M8A1"

Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7Thumbnail image of U.S. Bayonet-Knife M7 M7 Bayonet-Knife M7 U.S. military contract producers included:

—Bauer Ordnance Corp.
—Conetta Manufacturing Co.
—Frazier Manufacturing Co.
—General Cutlery Co.
—Imperial Schrade Corp.
—Columbus Milpar and    Manufacturing Co.
—Ontario Knife Co.

This U.S. bayonet-knife M7 was made 1980–1984 by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island.  According to noted U.S. bayonet authority Gary Cunningham, Imperial delivered 194,000 M7 bayonets to the U.S. Government in the 1980’s.

The Bayonet-Knife Scabbard M10 was developed in 1987, as the supply of M8A1 scabbards began to run out. The M10 scabbard is made of injection-molded plastic, with an integral nylon web belt hanger. This example is believed to have been produced 1987–88 by the Ontario Knife Co. of Franklinville, New York.

6.75 171 11.875 302 .880 22.4 Crosspiece: "US M7" and  "Imperial"

Scabbard Body (front):  "M10" and "ASSY 8448476" over "MFG 2V376"

M7 This example is still sealed in its factory wrapping.

Made in 1989, most likely by the General Cutlery Corporation of Fremont, Ohio. An example observed outside of the factory wrapper was made by General Cutlery. Records at Rock Island Arsenal indicate that General Cutlery delivered 24,400 M7 bayonets during 1989. These were to be the last M7 bayonets purchased by the government, until the September 11, 2001, attacks intervened.

n/a n/a n/a Wrapper:

"1005-00-076-9238" over "FCSM:  19204 P/N  1100077" over "Bayonet Knife, M7" over "1 Each" over "DAAA09-88-C-0366" over "A" and 12-88 overwritten by "11-89."

  Thumbnail image of M7 bayonet and M10 scabbard in wrapperThumbnail image of M7 bayonet and M10 scabbard in wrapper M7 This example is still sealed in its factory wrapping. The package contains the M7 bayonet and a black M10 scabbard, both of which were made by Ontario Knife Co., Franklinville, New York.

This bayonet was from what may be the final M7 contract, which was completed in 2009. Production had previously ended in 1989, but resumed in the years following the September 11, 2001, attacks.

This example is from contract W52H09-06-D-0068, which was signed in May 2006 and completed in April 2009. This bayonet/scabbard was delivered in March 2009, making it one of the last M7s purchased by the government.

n/a n/a n/a Wrapper:

"1095-00-017-9701" over "CAGE: 2V376 P/N 8427025" over "Bayonet w/Scabbard (M-7)" over "1 Each" over "W52H09-06-D-0068/0011" over "3/09"

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© Ralph E. Cobb 2011 All Rights Reserved

U.S. M5, M6, and M7 Bayonets & Foreign Copies

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