Country Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
        in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Australia Thumbnail image of Australian L1A2 bayonet used with the 9 mm. F1 submachine gunThumbnail image of Australian L1A2 bayonet used with the 9 mm. F1 submachine gunThumbnail image of Australian L1A2 bayonet used with the 9 mm. F1 submachine gunThumbnail image of Australian L1A2 bayonet used with the 9 mm. F1 submachine gunThumbnail image of Australian L1A2 bayonet used with the 9 mm. F1 submachine gunThumbnail image of Australian L1A2 bayonet used with the 9 mm. F1 submachine gun
L1A2
Knife bayonet used on the 9 mm. F1 submachine gun. Also used on the L1A1 variant of the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber FN–FAL assault rifle.

L1A2 bayonets were manufactured 1957–1984 at Small Arms Factory, Lithgow, NSW. The earliest examples, such as this one, had the squared fuller like their British and Canadian counterparts. Australia changed to the unique rounded fuller in 1960.

The scabbard is a wartime British No. 5 Mk. 1 body made by Wilkinson, paired with a post-War brass No. 5 Mk. 2 throatpiece.

7.75 197
11.625
295
.585
14.9
Scabbard (body): S294
Austria Thumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Austrian MP 34 submachine gun bayonet MP 34 Special version of the M1895 knife bayonet, produced for use with the Steyr-Solothurn Maschinenpistole 34 (MP34) submachine gun.

Very finely manufactured and widely considered the Rolls-Royce of submachine guns, the MP 34 was produced by Steyr 1930–1938 for use by the Austrian Army and Police; and for export to China, Chile, Bolivia, El Salvador, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Following the German Anschluss (annexation) of 1938, the MP 34 was produced until 1940 for the Wehrmacht, designated MP 34(ö), and for export to Portugal, designated Pistola Metralhadora m/938 and m/942.

MP 34s made for export included a bayonet lug for mounting the Austrian M1895 knife bayonet. The Austrian MP34 bayonet is a reworked M1895, where the M1895 bayonet’s domed crosspiece rivets are ground flush, the metal blued; and, the grips replaced and secured with screwbolts. A distinctive serial number is stamped into the pommel and also on the scabbard body. Serial numbers observed have been under 500, suggesting that the quantity of bayonets produced was likely very small. In any case, these specially- made MP 34 bayonets are scarcely encountered today.

Portugal used a different bayonet designated the m/938. The m/938 bayonet was a conversion of the earlier Portuguese M1904 Mauser-Vergueiro rifle bayonet, produced by Simson & Co. in Germany.
9.75 248 14.125 359 .590 15.0 Ricasso: Austrian (Hapsburg) Imperial Eagle and "OE" over "WG"

Pommel: "0161"

Scabbard (frog stud): Austrian (Hapsburg) Imperial Eagle and "OE" over "WG"

Scabbard (body): "AM" and "394"

Britain Thumbnail image of socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. II submachine gunThumbnail image of socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. II submachine gunThumbnail image of socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. II submachine gunThumbnail image of socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. II submachine gunThumbnail image of socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. II submachine gunThumbnail image of socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. II submachine gunThumbnail image of socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. II submachine gun STEN Mk. I Socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. caliber STEN Mk. II submachine gun.

The STEN Mk. I bayonet was fabricated out of sheet steel and utilized a rod-style blade copied from the No. 4 Mk. II* socket bayonet. Although the STEN rod was of a larger diameter, this enabled the STEN Mk. I bayonet to use the existing No. 4 scabbard. Even more crude than the later No. 4 Mk. III bayonet, the STEN Mk. I represented the ultimate in Second World War bayonet simplicity.

The firm of B. & J. Sippel Ltd. produced the sheet steel parts. Spikes marked with the lowercase ”L” are believed to be made by Laspee Engineering Co. of Isleworth. This example was assembled by the firm Grundy Ltd. of Teddington. The socket bears Grundy’s dispersal code, “S41”. The socket also bears a partial Broad Arrow acceptance mark.

The large forward projection on the stamped spring steel catch serves as a fingerguard, so the bayonet can also be used as a hand weapon.

75,280 bayonets were believed produced during 1943–1944, 55,800 by Grundy Ltd. and 19,480 by N.J. Edmonds Ltd. Nearly all of the bayonets were believed scrapped, making period examples like this one quite rare today.

More info on the STEN Mk. I makers and history.

8.00 203 12.00 305 .740 18.8 Socket: "B & J. S. Ltd" and "S41" and partial Broad Arrow

Blade: lowercase "L"

Spring: " B & J. S. L"

Thumbnail image of the British No. 4 spike bayonet No. 4 Spike Bayonet Socket bayonet used with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. V submachine gun.

Go to the No.4 Spike Bayonets page.

8.00 203 10.00 254 .595 15.1  
Thumbnail image of British No. 5 Mk. I bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 5 Mk. I bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 5 Mk. I bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 5 Mk. I bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 5 Mk. I bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 5 Mk. I bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 5 Mk. I bayonet No. 5 Mk. I Knife bayonet used with the 9 mm. Sterling L2 submachine gun. Also used on the .303 caliber Lee-Enfield No. 5 Mk. I rifle.

This example was made by the Wilkinson Sword Co. Ltd., 53 Pall Mall, London. The scabbard is the early No. 5, without the thick brass throatpiece found on post-war scabbards.

Unlike most bayonets, the wooden grip scales wrap completely around the tang. Early examples have the grip secured by a single screw and a press stud without the screw slot.  These early examples are very scarce today.

316,122 No. 5 Mk. I bayonets were produced by the end of 1945. Wartime production was carried out by four manufacturers: 

Wilkinson Sword Co, London—188,354;

Viners Ltd., Sheffield—42,000;

Radcliffe—75,000; and,

Elkington & Co. Ltd., Birmingham—10,768. 

An unknown quantity were produced post-war at the Royal Ordinance Factory, Poole.

No. 5 Mk. I bayonets were also commercially produced by Sterling Ltd. for sale with the 9 mm. Sterling (Patchett) machine carbine and at Rifle Factory Ishapore in India.    Ishapore bayonets were made in small quantity.  More recently, a large quantity of RFI-marked reproductions has surfaced.  The vast majority of RFI-marked No. 5 Mk. I bayonets encountered today are reproductions.

7.875 200 11.875 298 .895 22.7 Ricasso (Left):  "S294" over "W.S.C."

Ricasso (R. Side): Crown over "??" and "X" bending proof and broad arrow proofmark.

Press Stud:  broad arrow proofmark


Wilkinson marked their No. 5 bayonets with the initials “W.S.C.” and/or their dispersal code “S294”. 

Viners marked theirs with “VNS” or their dispersal code “N79”. 

Radcliffe (about which very little is known) marked theirs with their dispersal code, “N187”. 

Elkington marked theirs with their dispersal code, “M78”. 

ROF, Poole marked theirs with a “P” inside a small circle.

Sterling bayonets are marked on the blade with “Sterling” inside a rectangle.

Thumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonetThumbnail image of British No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonet No. 7 Mk. I/L The No. 7 Mk. I/L was used with the 9 mm. STEN Mk. V submachine gun.

Part knife bayonet and part socket bayonet, The No. 7 was a very innovative and complex design, with a unique swiveling pommel. The No. 7 Mk. I/L (spoken: number seven, mark one, land service) was intended to address a number of desires:

1) Replace the No. 4 spike bayonet (that nobody liked);
2) Utilize the clip-point blade of the No. 5 Mk. I bayonet (that everybody liked); and,
3) Serve a dual role as a fighting knife.

Despite all of it's ingenuity, the No. 7 Mk. I/L came to prove the old adage that a camel is a horse, as designed by committee. It was also capable of mounting to the Lee-Enfield No. 4 rifle, these bayonets were not issued as such, only being used with the No. 4 rifle for ceremonial purposes.

The grip scales are made of a resin impregnated cloth composite, Paxolin, and have deep finger grooves to allow use as a fighting knife. Examples are also found with black grips.

176,000 No. 7 Mk. I/L bayonets were produced. The design was perfected by the Wilkinson Sword Co., who produced 1,000 bayonets in 1944. Mass production was carried out by four manufacturers from 1945–1948:

Birmingham Small Arms, Ltd. —25,000;

Elkington & Co. Ltd., Birmingham —20,000;

Royal Ordnance Factory, Poole —30,000; and,

Royal Ordnance Factory, Newport —100,000.

This example was produced by Elkington & Co. of Birmingham. Elkington & Co. are one of the most important names in English silver and certainly the most important in silver plate - they invented the electroplating process in the 1830s.

7.875 200 12.25 311 .885

.595

22.5

15.1

Ricasso: "No. 7 Mk. I/L" and broad arrow proofmark and "M–78"

Pommel:  "M–78" and broad arrow proofmark.


B.S.A. marked theirs with their dispersal code, "M47B".

Elkington marked theirs with their dispersal code, “M–78”. 

ROF, Poole marked theirs with a “P” inside a small circle.

ROF Newport's marking is unknown

Thumbnail image of Sterling submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Sterling submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Sterling submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Sterling submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Sterling submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Sterling submachine gun bayonet Sterling Knife bayonet for use on the 9 mm. Sterling L2 submachine gun produced for commercial export by Sterling Armaments Co.

The Sterling L2 was widely exported, with 400,000 produced before production ceased. Sterling went bankrupt in 1988. Loved for its reliability, the Sterling first entered British service in 1944 (as the Patchett machine carbine) and served British forces until 1994.

Closely patterned on the No. 5 Mk. I bayonet, these commercial examples were produced for Sterling by Hopkinson Ltd.

Early examples used the No. 5 blade and had wood or plastic grips secured by screws or rivets, with screw spacing identical to the No. 5 Mk. I bayonet. Later examples, such as this one, used the L1A1 blade and had riveted sheet steel grips, with rivet spacing identical to the L1 Series bayonets.

This example has the Sterling trademark acid-etched on the blade, while some are found unmarked. The hilt and crosspiece are finished in black paint, except for the press stud which is parkerized. The blade is polished bright. The scabbard is a copy of the No. 5, but has a more crudely shaped point.

8.00 203 11.875 302 .995 23.0 Blade: "Sterling" inside a rectangle

Pommel: "H" over "C"

Haiti Thumbnail image of Haitian Uzi submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Haitian Uzi submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Haitian Uzi submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Haitian Uzi submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Haitian Uzi submachine gun bayonet Uzi Knife bayonet for use with the 9 mm. Uzi submachine gun.

The Haitian Uzi bayonet is similar to the Uzi bayonet used by Israel. The bayonet has black plastic grip scales. The blade markings are uniquely Haitian. The press stud has an unusual central screw slot. The scabbard has a plastic body and round metal frog stud, similar to the FAL Type B bayonet. The South African Uzi variant, designated S1, has sheet steel grip scales.

This example came in the web belt frog pictured below.

Haiti purchased arms from Israel during the 1970s and 1980s, including Uzi submachine guns (600 according to one source). According to the Arab Studies Group, Israel shipped Uzi submachine guns to Haiti 1974-77. The New York Times reported that Haiti received a shipment of Israeli-made Uzi’s ca. 1981 and that a subsequent shipment was seized by European authorities in 1983.

These Haitian Uzi bayonets were probably manufactured by Israel Military Industries Ltd. (IMI) or, more likely, the Belgian firearms giant Fabrique Nationale d'Herstal (FN Herstal), and supplied along with Uzi submachine guns that armed the notorious Tonton Macoutes militia. Following restoration of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide by Operation Uphold Democracy, the Uzi’s went to the newly-formed Police Nationale d’Haïti (Haitian National Police).

Tonton Macoutes was the common name given to the Milice Volontaires de la Sécurité Nationale (Militia of National Security Volunteers). In a Haitian fable, Tonton Macoutes was an evil spirit that kidnapped misbehaving children at night and stored them in his knapsack, never to be seen again.

6.625 168 10.875 276 .640 16.3 Blade: "U-0268"
Israel Thumbnail image of Israeli Uzi submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Israeli Uzi submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Israeli Uzi submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Israeli Uzi submachine gun bayonet Uzi Knife bayonet for use with the 9 mm. Uzi submachine gun.

I classify this unmarked example as Israeli, however, it may have been produced under license by Fabrique Nationale d'Herstal (FN Herstal) in Belgium.

This example has black plastic grip scales. The scabbard has a plastic body and round metal frog stud, as was used with the FAL Type B bayonet.

Israel Military Industries Ltd. (IMI) began producing the Uzi in 1955, but lacked sufficient manufacturing and marketing capacity to meet the demand for export contracts. IMI licensed marketing and export production of the Uzi to Belgian firearms giant, FN Herstal from 1956 into the 1970s. Terms of the arrangement were that all contracts required Israel’s advance approval and Israel received half of the profits.

ARMSCOR in South Africa produced the Uzi under license, where it was designated S1. The Ian Smith government in Rhodesia also produced the Uzi under license from 1976 until white minority rule ended in 1980. Unlicensed Uzi copies have been produced in China and Croatia.

The Netherlands was the first foreign country to adopt the Uzi, which was acquired by the Dutch Army in 1956. The Uzi was eventually adopted by police and military of more than 90 countries, including the U.S. Secret Service. The Uzi remains in production today, with more than 10 million believed to have been produced.

6.625 168 10.875 276 .640 16.3 None.
Portugal Thumbnail image of Protugal m/938 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Protugal m/938 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Protugal m/938 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Protugal m/938 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Protugal m/938 submachine gun bayonet m/938

Sword bayonet for use on MP 34 submachine guns made for Portugal by Steyr-Solothurn in German-occupied Austria. Portugal designated the MP 34 as the Pistola Metralhadora (machine pistol) m/938 (in 7.65 mm.) and m/942 (in 9 mm.).

Steyr designed the MP 34 to accept the Austrian M1895 bayonet. Steyr produced a special reworked version of the M1895 bayonet for MP 34 export contracts.

The m/938 bayonet is a conversion of the Portuguese M1904 bayonet. Portugal found it more economical to rework existing M1904 bayonets than to purchase the Austrian M1895 bayonets.

According to bayonet author and researcher Dennis Ottobre, the conversion consisted of having the hilt cut in half across the tang, a new crossguard with high mounted 15 mm. muzzle ring installed (replacing the original completely) and then the tang was shortened and rewelded with new shorter grips installed. With all the cutting and welding it was necessary to reblue them entirely. 

The m/942 remained in Portuguese service into the 1970s, seeing combat in Africa during the Portuguese Colonial Wars. It must have been quite a sight, seeing this old-world submachine gun serving alongside the futuristic Armalite AR–10 assault rifle.

11.125 283 15.375 391 .595 15.1 Ricasso (right): "Simson & Co." over "Suhl"

Pommel: "3666"
Thumbnail image of the Portugal m/948 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of the Portugal m/948 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of the Portugal m/948 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of the Portugal m/948 submachine gun bayonet m/948 Knife bayonet for the 9 mm. FBP (Fabrico Braco de Prata) m/948 submachine gun. This diminutive bayonet has a distinctive double-edged stiletto blade profile.

The m/948 was produced from 1948–1955. Fabrico Braco de Prata (Silver Arms Factory) was a State-owned arms factory in Lisbon. Today, FBP is known as INDEP—Indústrias Nacionais de Defesa, EP (Defense National Industries, Public Corporation).

The ricasso marking Armamento Marhina (Naval Armament), suggests that this example was produced for the Portuguese Navy. It's condition and the absence of a serial number indicates that this example was likely never issued.

The m/948 was the only indigenous submachine gun used by Portugal. It enjoyed a long service life, seeing combat service in Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portuguese India and Timor.

7.00 178 11.875 302 n/a Ricasso" "Armamento" over "Marinha" over "M48"
South Africa Thumbnail image of South Africs S1 (Uzi) submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of South Africs S1 (Uzi) submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of South Africs S1 (Uzi) submachine gun bayonet S1 (Uzi) Knife bayonet for use with the 9 mm. Uzi submachine gun, designated S1 in South Africa.

The South African S1 bayonet has sheet steel grip scales. It used the multipurpose R1 scabbard, with a plastic body and integral teardrop frog stud; and a universal throatpiece allowing use with the R1, S1, FAL Type B, and S.A. No. 9 bayonets.

Initially, Uzi submachine guns and bayonets were purchased from Fabrique Nationale d'Herstal (FN Herstal) in Belgium. South Africa subsequently obtained a license from FN Herstal to produce the Uzi at the state-owned ARMSCOR factory in Lyttleton. The license was supposedly revoked in 1963 following passage of United Nations Security Council Resolution 181, calling for a voluntary arms embargo against South Africa. Nonetheless, ARMSCOR continued producing the Uzi into the 1980s. According to a So. African contact, ARMSCOR made the S1 bayonet from 1968–1976.

6.625 168 11.00 279 .640 16.3 None.
Yugoslavia Thumbnail image of Yugoslavian M1956 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Yugoslavian M1956 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Yugoslavian M1956 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Yugoslavian M1956 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Yugoslavian M1956 submachine gun bayonetThumbnail image of Yugoslavian M1956 submachine gun bayonet M1956 Knife bayonet for use with the 9 mm. M1956 submachine gun, closely patterned after the Second World War German MP–40.

The blade is double-edged, reminiscent of the Serbian M1899 bayonet. The grips are made of molded plastic.

Although the dimensions seem pretty normative, it is so small and light that it seems like a toy. Look how small the scabbard is, compared to my hand (and I have very small hands).

6.75 171 11.25 286 n/a Ricasso (left): "76541" and "K" in circle inspection mark.

Ricasso (right): "36-189-6"

Crosspiece: "BK" and "K" in circle inspection mark.

Grip (left): "36-190-2" and "K" in circle inspection mark.

Grip (right): "36-190-3" and "K" in circle inspection mark.

Pommel: "K" in circle inspection mark.
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© Ralph E. Cobb 2013 All Rights Reserved        

Submachine Gun Bayonets

Submachine guns are not typically associated with bayonets. However, repeated attempts to equip these short-range firearms with bayonets were made, beginning in the 1930s. None were embraced by their respective service. Despite being panned by users, some submachine gun designers continued equipping their designs with bayonets into the 1970s. The following is by no means a definitive list, however, includes a number of submachine gun bayonets in my collection.
Header image of Brazil comblain cadet yataghan bayonet
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