Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
M1898/05 Sword bayonet used with the 8 mm. Gewehr 98, Kar 98a, and Kar 98k rifles.

This example was made for Prussia, in 1917, by Mauser at their Oberndorf plant. It was reworked for use during the Weimar Period and is one of a small number of 98/05 bayonets to see service with the Luftwaffe during the Nazi Period.

The rework included bluing the metal and cutting slots in the screwbolts securing the grip scales and press stud.

The "P.W. 1078." marking is a Prussian police (Schutzpolizei) property marking believed associated with the Westfalen Police School.

The "R.L.M." marking is an abbreviation for Reichsluftfahrtministerium (State Air Ministry). This terminology was used during the pre WW II years, since Germany was not permitted an Air Force (i.e., Luftwaffe) under the Treaty of Versailles. I suspect that the tiny "3" and "6" flanking the Imperial proofmark on the scabbard's ball finial may indicate the year (1936) the bayonet was taken into Luftwaffe service.

14.50 368 19.75 502 n/a Ricasso: "Waffenfabrik" over "Mauser A.G." over "Oberndorf a/M"

Spine: Crown over "W" over "17" and proofmark

Crosspiece: "P.W. 2078."

Flashguard: "R.L.M."

Scabbard (ball finial): "3" proofmark "6"

M1884/98 III Knife bayonet for use with the 8 mm. Mauser Kar 98k rifle of the Second World War.  This bayonet will also mount to most other Mauser bolt-action rifles that were based on the M1898.

The bayonet is an early example, made in 1935. The blade is marked using the letter/number code used from 1934–1937 to keep the maker’s identities secret. The scabbard was made in 1943 and bears the year of mfr. and Letter Code marking. The marking on this example was inadvertently double-struck.

The bayonet and scabbard were made by E. & F. Horster & Co. of  Solingen.

A pre-war example that was captured and reworked in eastern Europe, probably Yugoslavia. The number code marking was partially obliterated during rework and new serial numbers were applied to the crosspiece and frog stud.

This example has serrated, brown plastic grips.  Plastic grips are encountered about as often as are wood grips.

10.00 254 15.25 387 n/a Ricasso: "S/155?" (last character almost certainly a 'G') and "7281"

Crosspiece:  "9973"

Press Stud:  "WaA777"

Scabbard:  "43 asw" and "2564gg" and illegible waffenamt on ball tip.

Frog Stud: "9973"

M1884/98 III
This example was made in 1937 by Richard A. Herder of Solingen. The blade is marked with the maker’s trademark, as was customary from 1937–1940.  1937 Richard A. Herder trademarked bayonets are uncommon.

This example has wood grips.

10.00
254
15.25
387
n/a
Ricasso: "Rich. A. Herder" and "3228"

Spine: "37"

Proofs:  "WaA25?", located on: pommel (2x), stud nut, backstrap, under grips, underside of both grips, and scabbard ball.

Scabbard:  "Rich. A. Herder" and "3228"

M1884/98 III This example was made in 1939 by the Elite-Diamant Werke A.G., Siegmar-Schönau, near Chemnitz, Germany. This bayonet came in the Afrika Corps web frog shown below.

Before the Second World War, the Elite Diamant Werks (Elite Diamond Works) produced bicycles. The first Diamant bicycles were made in 1885.  During the War, they also produced small motorcycles. Post-War, the Works fell into Russian hands and became part of the East German State.  The company continued producing bicycles and developed alloy bicycle components, including the first alloy bicycles.  Diamant bicycles won world road race championships in the late 1950s. Diamant was privatized in 1992, following German reunification, and, today, is the oldest bicycle factory still operating in Germany.

9.875 251 15.00 381 n/a Ricasso: "Elite-Diamant" and "4156" over "d"

Spine: "39"

Pommel:  "WaA218" twice.

Scabbard:  "Elite-Diamant" over "39" and "4156" over "d". Illegible waffenamt on ball finial.
M1884/98 III Another wartime example that was captured and reworked in eastern Europe, probably Yugoslavia, where new serial numbers were applied to the crosspiece and frog stud.

This example was made by E. & F. Horster & Co. of Solingen.

The scabbard on this example has had its original serial number struck through and a new number applied, indicating that it was reworked in wartime Germany, before falling into allied hands (and being reworked a second time).

Although the date is no longer visible on the blade, BCN data proves that the bayonet was made in 1940. This example has wood grips.   The scabbard was made in 1939.

10.00 254 15.25 387 n/a Ricasso: "E u F. Horster" and "9756" over "q"

Crosspiece:  "3241"

Press Stud:  "WaA883"

Scabbard:  "E u F. Horster" over "1939" and "8531" overstamped with "0000" and "2061" beneath. Illegible waffenamt on ball tip.

Frog Stud: "3241"

M1884/98 III Another wartime example that was captured and reworked in eastern Europe, probably Yugoslavia, where new serial numbers were applied to the crosspiece and frog stud.

The bayonet and scabbard were made by F.W. Holler of Solingen.  The bayonet was made in 1941 and the scabbard in 1943.

This example has serrated, reddish-brown plastic grips.

10.00 254 15.25 387 n/a Ricasso: "41 fze" over "a" and "1379"

Crosspiece:  "6972"

Pommel:  WaA883"

Scabbard:  "fze 43" and "2068h" and illegible waffenamt on ball tip.

Frog Stud: "6972"
M1884/98 III This example was made in 1942 by Weyersberg Kirschbaum & Co. of Solingen.

The blade and scabbard are marked with the Letter Code, as was customary from 1940–1945.

This example has wood grips. I found this example mounted on this Kar 98k Zf 41 sharpshooter's rifle brought back by a returning veteran.

According to M1884/98 III researcher Andrej 'Andy' Blazicek, the serial number suffix is an "N".  WKC used a special Sutterlin font which is difficult to decipher.

10.00 254 15.25 387 n/a Ricasso: "42 cvl" and "9578" over “N”

Scabbard:  "42 cvl" and "9578" over “N”

Pommel:  "WaA 519" "WaA 519"

M1884/98 III Another wartime example that was captured and reworked in eastern Europe, probably Yugoslavia, where new serial numbers were applied to the crosspiece and frog stud. The flashguard has also been deleted.

The bayonet was made in 1944 by Carl Eickhorn Waffenfabrik AG of Solingen. The scabbard was made in 1943 by the firm of E. Pack & Sohn.

This example has wood grips.

10.00 254 15.25 387 n/a Ricasso: "cof 44" and "9352" over "K"

Crosspiece:  "6442"

Pommel:  "WaA51" (probably is 'WaA519' and the '9' didn't strike).

Scabbard:  "43 cul" and "4067e" and illegible waffenamt on ball tip.

Frog Stud: "8711"

M1884/98 III Riveted Grip A late-war example with the plastic grip scales secured by rivets.

This example was made in 1944 by E. & F. Horster & Co. of Solingen.

 

10.00 254 15.25 387 n/a Ricasso (left): "44 ASW"

Ricasso (right): "2424" over "dd"

Pommel: "WaA519"

Scabbard: "44 ASW" and "2424" over "dd" and illegible waffenamt on ball tip.

Thumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonetThumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonetThumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonetThumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonetThumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonetThumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonetThumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonetThumbnail image of German M1884/98 Third Pattern Export bayonet M1884/98 III Export An unusual example with a full muzzle-ring for export customers.

This example was made in 1935 by Mundlow & Company of Magdeburg (Mundlos AG), as indicated by the Number Code of 244 and Year Code G. Mundlos was a peacetime manufacturer of sewing machines.

Export bayonets are typically unmarked, except for serial numbers added later by the purchasing government. Finding this example that bears German markings is most unusual. The bayonet shows no evidence of ever having been blued, suggesting that it may have failed German government quality control prior to bluing and been diverted for use in fulfilling export contracts. It was also made without a flashguard.

The scabbard is from a Spanish M1943 bayonet. During the Spanish Civil War of 1936–39, Spain was an export customer for both German rifles and bayonets. Although well-preserved, this example has seen heavy use, something also consistent with Spanish service.

9.875 251 15.00 381 .620 15.7 Ricasso: "S/244.G" and "9772" over "a"

Pommel: two partial Waffenamts "WaA2??"

Crosspiece (face): illegible partial Waffenamt

Press stud (side of catch): "2962"

FG 42 Rod bayonet for use with the 8 mm. Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 (Paratroop Rifle 1942) assault rifle. It is believed that 7,000 FG 42 rifles were produced before production ceased in early 1945.

Three different FG 42 rod bayonets were used. The first is believed to be a shortened French M1936 bayonet. This was followed by two German-made variants. This example is of the second German-made variant, which is slightly shorter than the first two types and lacks the knurled grip section.

The dimpled metal end cap is missing on this example, although the four staking marks are visible. No scabbard was issued. When not in use, the bayonet was reversed to stow between the bipod mount and forestock.

I was able to compare my example with another bayonet that was still paired with its Heinrich Krieghoff-manufactured rifle (in Canada). Both bayonets were identically marked, with "2" on one rocker and three illegible letters on the other. It was good fortune that my bayonet had the upper half of the marking and the other bayonet the lower half.

Superimposing images of the two revealed that the letters were "gcy". The letters are tiny, unreadable to the unaided eye. The flat upon which the marking is stamped measures only 5 mm. wide by 3.5 mm. high. The close-up image at left was taken through a 20x stereo microscope. The pink shape in this superimposed image of the partial maker markings illustrates the actual size of the flat on which the marking is stamped.

The Letter Code "gcy" identifies the bayonet's maker as the firm of L. O. Dietrich in Altenburg, a peacetime maker of sewing machines. L. O. Dietrich produced M1898/05 bayonets during the First World War and machine guns during the Second World War. After the Second World War, the firm's property was seized by the East German State and the firm disappeared.

7.50 191 10.50 267 .550 14.0 Rockers: "2" and three letters (illegible)
VZ–24 Modified Sword bayonet modified for use with the 8 mm. Mauser Kar 98k, G24(t), and G33/40 Mauser rifles. “G 24(t)” was the official German nomenclature for the Czech VZ–24 rifle.

This example was originally made in 1926 by Ceskoslovenska zbrojovka, a.s., Brno (roughly, Czechoslovakian Arms Factory, Inc.) as a VZ–24 bayonet and was subsequently modified under German occupation for issue to German forces.

This example exhibits many of the characteristics common to German-modified VZ–24 bayonets:

The muzzle ring is ground away, leaving protruding "ears";

Screw slots have been cut in the grip-securing nuts and in the nut securing the press-stud;

A serial number has been applied to the ricasso;

The rivet securing the scabbard throat has been deleted, the throat reversed and secured at the side by a screw; and,

Both bayonet and scabbard are blued.

The scabbard was made in 1927 by contractor Karel Schultz, in Kormorany, Moravia. Schultz is believed to have produced approximately 300,000 scabbards from 1924–1929.

11.75 298 17.00 432 n/a Ricasso (right):   "E" (lion) "26" and "6519"

Ricasso (left):  "CSZ" over "G"

Scabbard (frog stud): "H" (lion) "27" and "K" (circle) "M" (circle), inside a rectangle.
S 24(t) This example was made 1940–41 in German-occupied Czechoslovakia at Waffenfabrik Bystrica Werke (former Československá zbrojovka a.s., Povazska Bystrica plant).  Both bayonet and scabbard have German waffenamt acceptance markings and exhibit many of the characteristics common to VZ–24 bayonets made under German occupation:

The crosspiece was made without a muzzle ring;

Grip-securing nuts and the nut securing the press-stud are made with screwdriver slots;

A serial number has been applied to the ricasso;

No Czech government markings are present; and,

Both bayonet and scabbard are blued.

The scabbard was made at the Waffenfabrik Brünn Werke (former Československá zbrojovka a.s., Brno plant) in 1943 and bears the German “dot” Letter Code.
11.75 298 17.00 432 n/a Ricasso (right): Double-circle "Z"

Ricasso (left):  "WaA A80" and "113"

Scabbard (frog stud): "WaA63"

Scabbard (body): "dot" over "43"
Fire Service Bayonet Feuerwehr Seitengewehr (Fire Service Bayonet). Dress bayonet for ceremonial wear by a fireman with his "walking out" (evening dress) uniform.  All German government officials wore a seitengewehr (sidearm) with their dress uniform, a tradition that goes back some 400 years. 

Although these have no provision for mounting to a rifle, they are still classified as bayonets.

The tiger figural is the trademark of Lauterjung & Co., Tiger Stahlwaren-und Waffenfabrik of Solingen.  The Lauterjung family began blademaking in the 1700s, producing knives, razors & blades, scissors, table ware, and, manicure implements. They produced daggers 1935–1945, but were not known to have produced comparable material in earlier years. Lauterjung is better known for its other Solingen factory, Puma-Werke. The Puma trademark dates back to Lauterjung's beginnings in the 1700s and remains in commercial use to the present-day.

This was a privately purchased item. Georg Rieder of Munich was the retailer who sold the piece.

All metal parts are nickel plated.  The scabbard is painted with high-gloss black lacquer. Leather washer is present on blade. 

Black leather belt frog (Carter #293) and Fire/Police troddel (knot). The troddel has a red striped ball, black strap with silver/red thread.

Go to the Bayonet Belt Frogs Page.

9.875 251 14.75 375 n/a Ricasso: "Georg Rieder, Munchen"; Tiger figural
M1884/98 Belt Frog Brown leather belt frog for carrying the M1884/98 III knife bayonet.

Measures 8.25 in. (210 mm.) long by 2.00 in. (51 mm.) wide.    

Has 4  steel rivets and is of sewn construction, without a hilt strap.

Carter classified this frog as #308. The maker and year marks have been worn away. However, Carter recorded production dates from 1939–43.

This frog came on a Belgian M1916 Gendarmerie bayonet. The bayonet and frog had obviously been together a long time. This pairing suggests that it may have been issued to local Belgian "police" who helped maintain order during the German occupation. As shown in the images at left, there is some damage; and both the frog and the outward-facing wooden bayonet grip show evidence of charring.

Go to the Bayonet Belt Frogs Page.

n/a n/a n/a None.
M1884/98 Belt Frog Brown leather belt frog for carrying the M1884/98 III knife bayonet.

This example was made by Gebruder Klinge of Dresden in 1937.

Measures 8.875 in. (225 mm.) long by 2.00 in. (51 mm.) wide.    

Has 4  aluminum rivets and is of sewn construction. Hilt strap is missing.

Carter classified this frog as #311.

Go to the Bayonet Belt Frogs Page.

n/a n/a n/a Reverse: "Gebruder Klinge" over "Dresden" over "1937"
Afrika Korps Belt Frog Web belt frog for carrying the M1884/98 III knife bayonet. Web frogs were used in North Africa by the Deutsche Afrika Korps (DAK) during the Second World War, because leather frogs wouldn't hold up in the hot, dry desert climate.

Measures 8.375 in. (213 mm.) long by 1.625 in. (41 mm.) wide. 

Carter classified this frog as #316.

According to Carter, the color of these frogs varied, with the earliest type being olive drab in color. As the Afrika Korps only existed for two years, these frogs are very scarce.  Fakes are far more common than legitimate examples. This frog came on the 1939 Elite-Diamant bayonet shown above.

Go to the Bayonet Belt Frogs Page.

n/a n/a n/a None.
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© Ralph E. Cobb 2009 All Rights Reserved        
During the World War II (1933–1945) period, Germany used three different marking systems on M1884/98 Third Pattern bayonet to identify manufacturers: 

Listing of M1884/98 III makers and codes

Read my article on the M1884/98 III bayonet

German Bayonets 1933-1945

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