Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
No. 9 Mk. I Socket bayonet for use with the .303 caliber Lee-Enfield No. 4 rifle.

This example is a British No. 9 Mk. I, made in 1949 at the Royal Ordinance Factory, Poole. It is marked on the socket underside, with the government arrow inside a "U" property mark.

The mark on this example is a less common type, with the arrow pointing downwards, rather than the proper (and more common) upwards arrow. Although observed on various equipment, it is not known how the downward arrow mark came to be used.

No. 9 Bayonets Page

7.75 197 9.875 251 .595 15.1 Socket (right): "J" arrow "2" (viewer's mark)

Socket (underside): "A" and "arrow-U" and "8"

Ledge: “P” inside a small circle and "1949"

South Africa Pattern No. 9 Socket bayonet for use with the .303 caliber Lee-Enfield No. 4 rifle. The South African blade profile differs significantly from the British No. 9 Mk. I bayonet pictured above.

The bayonets were made by Armaments Corporation of South Africa (ARMSCOR), Lyttelton Engineering Works, in Pretoria. ARMSCOR is the State-owned arms manufacturer in South Africa.

According to Skennerton, the bayonets were made up in the 1960's using blades salvaged from FN-made Uzi submachine gun bayonets (known in So. Africa as the S1 bayonet). However, it has not been conclusively documented whether old S1 blades were actually used or whether the S1 blade was just copied. The blade attaches to the socket with two steel pins.

I was able to acquire an unassembled Uzi bayonet blade from a seller in Tel-Aviv, Israel, to compare with the S.A. No. 9. The Uzi blade is dimensionally identical to the blade of my S.A. Pattern No. 9, as shown in this comparison image. A close study also demonstrates that, if the blade were used for the S.A. No. 9, the forward grip hole would need to be welded and ground flat, then two new holes machined for pinning the Uzi blade to the No. 9 socket. This comparison demonstrates that it is entirely plausible that salvaged Uzi blades could have been used for manufacturing the S.A. No. 9 bayonet.

The British No. 5 Mk. I scabbard would not work with the So. African No. 9 blade, so other scabbards were substituted. There was no dedicated S.A. No. 9 scabbard.

The scabbard on this example is from a M1 bayonet (the M1 was So. Africa's variant of the famous FN-FAL assault rifle). The M1 bayonet was the So. African variant of the FAL Type A bayonet. By the time the So. Africa No. 9 bayonets were made, the M1 bayonet was being replaced by the R1 bayonet (the So. African variant of the FAL Type C bayonet). One of the pictures at left shows that the M1 scabbard is longer than necessary for the No. 9 blade.

The S1 scabbard was also used with the S.A. No. 9 bayonet. The S1 scabbard is a shorter version of the steel M1 scabbard. The nylon R1 scabbard was also used with the So. Africa No. 9 bayonet (as well as the S1).

No. 9 Bayonets Page

6.625 168 8.625 219 .595 15.1 None.
Thumbnail image of South African FAL Type B bayonetThumbnail image of South African FAL Type B bayonetThumbnail image of South African FAL Type B bayonetThumbnail image of South African FAL Type B bayonetThumbnail image of South African FAL Type B bayonetThumbnail image of South African FAL Type B bayonet FAL Type B Knife bayonet for use on the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber Fabrique Nationale - Fusil Automatique Leger (Light Automatic Rifle), or FN–FAL, assault rifle equipped with the long Belgian "Browning-style" flash hider.

The Type B differed from the FAL Type A bayonet in having a shorter blade, larger muzzle ring, and lacking the Type A bayonet's flash hider prongs.

The long flash hider was not popular, only being adopted in small numbers by Chile, Cuba, South Africa, and the West German Bundesgrenzschutz (Federal Border Guard). The T-48 FAL rifles used in the 1950s U.S. Army Trials that resulted in adoption of the M14 selective fire rifle were also equipped with the Type B bayonet. Not having been produced in large numbers, the Type B bayonet is uncommon today.

This example bears a FN production mark on the tang, signifying manufacture by FN in the second quarter of 1962. It also bears a partial "SAP" on the pommel, signifying use by the South African Police.

The scabbard has a plastic body, with a round metal frog stud.

I obtained this example from South Africa. The scabbard was in the S1 leather belt frog pictured below.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.625 168 11.25 286 .700 17.8 Tang (upper): "2" with line over top and to left

Pommel: partial "SAP"

S1 (Uzi) Knife bayonet for use with the 9 mm. Uzi submachine gun, designated S1 in South Africa.

The South African S1 bayonet has sheet steel grip scales. It used the multipurpose R1 scabbard, with a plastic body and integral teardrop frog stud; and a universal throatpiece allowing use with the R1, S1, FAL Type B, and S.A. No. 9 bayonets.

Initially, Uzi submachine guns and bayonets were purchased from Fabrique Nationale d'Herstal (FN Herstal) in Belgium. South Africa subsequently obtained a license from FN Herstal to produce the Uzi at the state-owned ARMSCOR factory in Lyttleton. The license was supposedly revoked in 1963 following passage of United Nations Security Council Resolution 181, calling for a voluntary arms embargo against South Africa. Nonetheless, ARMSCOR continued producing the Uzi into the 1980s. According to a So. African contact, ARMSCOR made the S1 bayonet from 1968–1976.

This example came in the Pattern 1970 Web Equipment belt frog pictured below.

Submachine Gun Bayonets Page

6.625 168 11.00 279 .640 16.3 None.
R1 (FAL Type C) Socket bayonet introduced in the 1960s for the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber R1 (FN-FAL) assault rifle.

The South African "M" inside a "U" property mark represents "Union (of South Africa) Military."

This example has an early FN-produced steel-bodied scabbard, as evidenced by the Belgian proofmark on the throatpiece.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.75 171 11.50 292 .890 22.6 Socket: Superimposed "M" "U" and 113704"

Scabbard (throatpiece): "[1]"

Thumbnail image of South African R1 bayonetThumbnail image of South African R1 bayonetThumbnail image of South African R1 bayonetThumbnail image of South African R1 bayonetThumbnail image of South African R1 bayonet R1 (FAL Type C) This R1 lacks South African ownership markings, however, has a uniquely South African scabbard.

This example is parkerized, with black paint over the parkerizing on the socket only.

Early R1 bayonets, like the example above, were purchased from FN. South Africa later began producing R1 bayonets and scabbards at the State-owned arms factory, ARMSCOR.

The scabbard is an early pattern believed manufactured in South Africa. It is unusual in having a shiny plastic body, a transverse leg-tie hole in the ball finial, and a steel frog stud.

South African-made R1 scabbards have the throatpiece oriented so that the socket faces inward when carried. Other countries' FAL Type C scabbards had the throatpiece oriented so that the socket faces outward when carried.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.375 162 11.375 289 .890 22.6 Socket: "275224"

Scabbard (body): "66" in an oval

R1 (FAL Type C) This R1 example came in the multipurpose R1 scabbard, with a plastic body and integral teardrop frog stud; and a universal throatpiece allowing use with the R1, S1, FAL Type B, and S.A. No. 9 bayonets.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.75 171 11.50 292 .890 22.6 Socket: Superimposed "M" "U" and "222912"

 

P1907 Belt Frog Dark brown leather belt frog for carrying the Pattern 1907 bayonet.

The frog measures 7.50 in. (190 mm.) long by 2.70 in. (70 mm.) wide. The rivets are steel, as is the roller type buckle.

Carter classified this frog as #575.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a None.
No. 9 Belt Frog Dark brown leather belt frog with the cut away front section for carrying the South African Pattern No. 9 bayonet. The socket faces to the right when carried.

The frog measures 7.25 in. (185 mm.) long by 2.625 in. (67 mm.) wide. Constructed with seven domed steel rivets.  Incorporates a steel roller type buckle.

Carter classified this frog as #577. According to Carter, these were worn by the South African Police.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a None.
M1 Belt Frog Brown leather belt frog with the cut away front for carrying the M1 bayonet. The M1 bayonet was the So. African variant of the FAL Type A bayonet.

Constructed with seven copper rivets. Incorporates a steel roller type buckle. The frog measures 7.50 in. (190 mm.) long by 2.70 in. (70 mm.) wide.

Carter classified this frog as #576.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a None.
Thumbnail image of South African leather s1 belt frogThumbnail image of South African leather s1 belt frog S1 Belt Frog Brown leather belt frog for carrying the S1 and FAL Type B bayonets.

The frog measures 6.875 in. (175 mm.) long by 2.00 in. (51 mm.) wide.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

This example came on the FAL Type B bayonet pictured above.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a None.
Pattern 1961/64 Web Pouch w/Frog Web belt pouch with integral frog for carrying the M1 (FAL Type A) bayonet.

According to Carter, Pattern 1961/64 web equipment was the production version of an experimental design, used prior to So. Africa's fielding of the Pattern 1970 web equipment system.

Carter classified this pouch/frog as #579.

This example was made in 1962. The identity of the maker represented by "L.B. & D.I.F." is not known. Hopefully further research will bring this to light.

The pouch is made of gray-green webbing, although the exterior of this example been sun-faded to khaki tan. The fittings are made of blackened brass. The pouch measures 8.00 in. (203 mm.) high. The pouch measures 4.00 in. (102 mm.) wide at the top, tapering to 2.00 in. (51 mm.) wide at the bottom.

As the images at left illustrate, the pouch has one straight side and one tapered side. The frog is on the tapered side, with heavy blanket-stitching to reinforce the frog stud opening. This one-side-tapered arrangement resulted in the left and right side pouches not being interchangeable.

The So. African seller indicated that this piece came from Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). Although I cannot substantiate Rhodesian use, Pattern 1961/64 webbing would have been used during the early phase of the Rhodesian Bush War, which began in 1964.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a Inside of Cover: "L.B.& D.I.F." over U-arrow and "62"
Pattern 1970 Web Belt Frog Olive green web belt frog used with the Pattern 1970 web equipment. Used for carrying the M1, R1, and S1 bayonets.

The frog slips over the equipment belt and is secured with a glove fastener facing the inside of the frog's belt loop. This equipment was used during the 1970s and 1980s.

The frog measures 6.50 in. (165 mm.) long by 1.50 in. (38 mm.) wide. The distinctive frog stud opening is heavily overstitched.

Carter classified this frog as #582.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a None.
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Bayonets of South Africa

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