Republic of China (Nationalist)

Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Thumbnail image of Chinese ersatz bayonetThumbnail image of Chinese ersatz bayonetThumbnail image of Chinese ersatz bayonet Ersatz Crude sword bayonet for use with 8 mm. Mauser 1898 rifles.

These all-metal bayonets are believed to have been produced in Belgium following the First World War for export to China. This example appears to utilize a Pattern 1853-style triangular blade. The blade is unmarked, so it is unclear whether it was salvaged from an earlier socket bayonet or newly manufactured in the 1920s, when this bayonet was assembled.

The hilt was originally painted black, however, only traces of the paint remain.

16.625 422 21.625 549 .610 15.5 None.
M1924—
Type 30 Blade
Sword bayonet for use on the 8 mm Mauser M1924 andM1924/30 Short Rifles purchased from FN and and China's domestically copy, the Model 21 Short Rifle. This bayonet would also mount to later Chinese rifles based on the Mauser Model 98.

This is an actual Japanese Type 30 blade mated to a Chinese M1924-style hilt. It shares other characteristics of Japanese production: the fit and finish are quite high by Chinese standards, the grip screws set in oval escutcheons, and the scabbard. It could possibly have been made in Japan, but there's no way to know. This is the only example that I have ever seen outside of Janzen’s Notebook.

There were also similar bayonets produced using British P1907 blades and FN M1924 blades.

15.625
397
20.75
527
.610
15.5
Ricasso: Tokyo arsenal marking (four stacked cannonballs)
M1935 Sword bayonet for use on the 8 mm Mauser Standard-Modell short rifles purchased from Mauser and China's domestic copy, the 'Chiang Kai-Shek' rifle.

Much cruder design and construction than the M1924 bayonet shown above. More typical of Chinese manufacturing of the period, where much of the work was done by hand. The scabbard for these were typically leather, so most did not survive the hard use these bayonets experienced.

17.00 432 22.00 559 .625 15.9 Crosspiece (right): "1491"

People's Republic of China (Communist)

Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Type 53 Folding bayonet permanently attached to the 7.62 mm. Type 53 rifle (copy of the Soviet Mosin-Nagant M1944). Folds to the right side and stows in a cutout in the rifle's forestock. 12.25 311 15.25 387 .555 14.1 None.
Type 56 Carbine Folding bayonet permanently attached to the 7.62 mm. Type 56 Carbine (copy of the Russian Simonov SKS–45 rifle). Folds under the barrel and stows in a cutout in the rifle's forestock. 12.00 305 14.875 378 .555 14.1 None.
Type 56 Rifle Folding bayonet permanently attached to the 7.62 mm. Type 56 rifle (copy of the Soviet Kalashnikov AK47). Folds under the barrel and stows in a cutout in the rifle's forestock. Differs from Type 56 Carbine bayonet in not having a muzzle ring.

Provenance obtained with the bayonet indicates that this example was obtained in Battambong, Cambodia, in 1998, from a former Khmer Rouge soldier. Research indicates that it was most likely issued to the anti-Vietnamese forces of the Khmer People's National Liberation Front (KPNLF) and the Khmer Rouge via United Nations convoys over the Thailand border in 1979.

AK Bayonets Page

9.75 248 11.75 298 n/a None.
AK47 Knife bayonet made for use with semi-automatic 7.62 mm. AK47 assault rifles commercially exported in the 1980s by Polytech and NORINCO (China North Industries Corporation).

A copy of the Russian 6X2 bayonet, these bayonets were made for shipment with exported Type 56 (AK47) rifles only. Rifles used by the People's Liberation Army had the permanently-attached folding spike bayonet shown above.

The scabbard has an integral web belt hanger with a hilt strap secured with a glove fastener. The web belt hanger measures 3.625 in. (92 mm.) long x 0.875 in. (22 mm.) wide.

The reason for the unusual grip and second partial muzzle ring was that the bayonet was an afterthought, the AK47 not being initially designed to accept a bayonet.

AK Bayonets Page

7.875 200 12.25 311 .695 17.7 None.
AKM Type II Knife bayonet for use with the semi-automatic 7.62 mm. AKM assault rifles commercially exported in the 1980s by Polytech and NORINCO (China North Industries Corporation).

Essentially, a copy of the Russian 6X4 (AKM Type II) bayonet, except that the sawback and wire-cutter features have been eliminated.

This example has a black plastic grip and scabbard body. This example also has the chromed steel belt hanger provided on the earliest U.S. imports.

There is no evidence that the People's Liberation Army ever used this bayonet.

AK Bayonets Page

6.00

 

152 10.875 276 .695 17.7 None.
AKM Type II Another example of the Chinese AKM Type II bayonet with an orange plastic grip and scabbard body.

This example is serialized, indicating that it was shipped along with an AKM rifle.

AK Bayonets Page

6.00 152 10.875 276 .695 17.7 Crosspiece: "15402"
Thumbnail image of Chinese AKM Type II bayonet with orange grip secured by a brass pinThumbnail image of Chinese AKM Type II bayonet with orange grip secured by a brass pinThumbnail image of Chinese AKM Type II bayonet with orange grip secured by a brass pinThumbnail image of Chinese AKM Type II bayonet with orange grip secured by a brass pin AKM Type II This example is a variation with the orange grip secured by a brass pin.

AK Bayonets Page

6.00 152 10.875 276 .695 17.7 Crosspiece:"0763"
AKM Type II Scarce example of the Chinese AKM Type II bayonet with an olive green plastic grip and scabbard body.

The olive color is almost indistinguishable from black under room lighting, but the difference becomes apparent outdoors in daylight. The photos at left show the color as it appears in daylight. Next to a black example, the color difference is readily apparent.

The story behind origin of the olive green variant remains a mystery. The most prevalent theories are that these were made to go with rifles imported by Clayco, one of the earliest USA importers of Chinese AKM rifles; or that the green color occurred by accident. Hopefully, further research will clarify the origin of this unusual variant.

AK Bayonets Page

6.00 152 10.875 276 .695 17.7 None.
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Bayonets of China

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