Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
M1851 Federal Rifle Triangular bayonet for use with the 10.4 mm. M1851 Federal Rifle.

Essentially, a socket bayonet without a socket, this bayonet mounts to the rifle by means of a dovetailed mortise. This example has a spring catch. Variations with a wing screw or knurled locking screw are also encountered. The blade and elbow were blued. The bluing on this example is surprisingly intact, but has turned to patina.

The Swiss Federal Rifle was a percussion muzzle loading sharpshooter's rifle (Stutzer). These were precision rifles with heavy round barrels, adjustable long-range sights, and double set triggers. Its 10.4 mm. projectile was considered to have the finest ballistics of any contemporary muzzle loading rifle.

20.50 521 24.25 616 n/a Wedge (underside): "218"
M1863 Socket bayonet for use with the muzzle loading 10.4 mm. M1863 Infanteriegewehr (infantry rifle); and the 10.4 mm. rimfire M1863/67 Milbank-Amsler conversion; M1867 Peabody; and, M1869 Vetterli rifles. This bayonet could also be used with the 10.4 mm. Vetterli M1871 Infantry and M1871 Stutzer (sharpshooter) repeating rifles.

The Swiss Peabody rifles were purchased in 1867 from the Providence Tool Co. of Providence, Rhode Island, so were designated M1867.  Both the M1863/67 Milbank-Amsler conversion and M1867 Peabody rifles were an interim measure to acquire breechloading cartridge rifles while completing development of the Vetterli repeating rifle.

This bayonet was used from 1863 to 1878, when the Vetterli rifle was updated to use a sword bayonet. During this period, there were two socket bayonet variants, the M1863 and M1871, which are difficult to distinguish without having known examples against which to compare. Both types were used interchangeably.

The distinguishing factor is that the M1863 is of slightly heavier construction than the M1871. The difference is readily apparent in this comparison image. Older bayonet reference books are not consistent as to which variant was which. A contemporary Swiss researcher indicates that the M1863 is the heavier version, weighing around 350 grams; and the M1871 is the lighter version, weighing closer to 300 grams. I would tend to defer to his determination, since he resides in Switzerland and more than 20 years have passed since publishing of the older references.

This example weighs in at 367 grams, so is the M1863 variant.  Based on the serial numbers, this example could have been used with either a M1863 muzzle loader, M1863/67 Milbank-Amsler, or M1869 Vetterli.  According to Vetterli production records, serial numbers 1100 and 2744 correspond to M1869 infantry rifles made by Valentin Sauerbrey of Basel, in 1870 and 1871, respectively. 
19.125 486 21.75 552 .710 18.0 Socket: "1100"

Elbow (right): Swiss cross over "V"

Elbow (left): "2744"

Locking Ring: "7" and "44"

Locking Ring Screw: "7" and "44"

M1871 Socket bayonet for use with the Swiss 10.4 mm. Vetterli M1871 Infantry and M1871 Stutzer (sharpshooter) repeating rifles. This bayonet could also be used with the M1863/67 Milbank-Amsler conversion; M1867 Peabody; and, M1869 Vetterli rifles.

This example weighs in at 312 grams, so is the M1871 variant. According to Vetterli production records, serial number 73556 corresponds to a M1869/71 infantry rifle made by S.I.G. Neuhausen in 1872. Serial number 1034 corresponds to a M1871 Stutzer rifle made at Eidgenössische Montier-Werstätte, Bern (Swiss Federal Installation, Bern) in 1872.

 

 

19.50 495 22.25 565 .730 18.5 Socket: "1034" and "73556"

Socket (rear of bridge): "7" and "3"

Elbow (right): Swiss cross over "S"

Elbow (left): script "7"

Locking Ring: "73"

Locking Ring Screw: "79"

 

M1889
Knife bayonet for use on the 7.5 mm. Schmidt-Rubin M1889 and M1911 straight-pull rifles. The M1889 was the first bayonet type made for the Schmidt-Rubin, with no rivet or ridge in the fuller. Most were later fitted with a rivet in the fuller.  Unaltered early examples are scarce.

According to production records, the M1889 rifle with serial number 43094 was produced in 1892.  1892 was only the second year of production, as production of the M1889 rifles did not commence until 1891. 

The muzzle ring on bayonets for the M1889 and M1911 rifles is larger at 15 mm. (0.60 in.) than the 14 mm. (0.55 in.) muzzle ring on bayonets for the M1911 carbine and M1931 Short Rifle.

The leather tab on the scabbard is for securing the scabbard in the belt frog. This example came in the 1917-dated frog pictured below.

11.75
300
16.50
420
.600
15.2
Ricasso (right): "Maschinenfabrik" over "Bern"

Crosspiece: "43094" and Swiss cross

Scabbard (ball tip): Swiss cross
M1889/11 Knife bayonet for use on the 7.5 mm. Schmidt-Rubin M1911 rifle and carbine. This type bayonet can be found with either the larger 15 mm. (.600 in.) rifle muzzle ring or smaller 14 mm. (0.550 in.) carbine muzzle ring.

This example is somewhat of a conundrum, in that it has the smaller carbine muzzle ring, but according to production records, the serial number, 371430, is for a M1911 rifle that was produced in 1914.

The ridge near the base of the fuller was added to help retain the bayonet in it’s scabbard. Early examples, like the one above, had no ridge. Most of these were modified by placing a rivet in the fuller.

11.75 300 16.625 425 .560 14.0 Ricasso: "Waffenfabrik" over "Neuhausen"

Crosspiece:  "371430" and Swiss cross

Scabbard (Tip):  Swiss cross

M1914 Pioneer Sawback sword bayonet for use on the 7.5 mm. Schmidt-Rubin M1911 carbine and M1931 Short Rifle (K31).

According to production records, the M1931 Short Rifle with serial number 648725 was produced in 1941.

The M1914 has a swell-point blade profile, where the blade is wider at the point than at the ricasso. The 1914 is fullered on only one side.

The M1914 was issued to only select troops.  When issued with K31s the M1914 Pioneer bayonet was issued to:

—Engineers;
—Driver corporals and mounted artillery    sergeants;
—Blacksmiths,  blacksmith private first    class or lance corporal, blacksmith    sergeants;
—Horse transport soldiers, PFCs,    corporals and sergeants;
—Saddle makers; and,
—Drivers for motorized field artillery,    howitzers and heavy howitzers.

19.00 483 24.00 610 .560 14.0 Ricasso: "Waffenfabrik" over "Neuhausen"

Crosspiece:  "648725" and Swiss cross

Scabbard (Tip):  Swiss cross
M1918 Double-edged knife bayonet for use on the 7.5 mm. Schmidt-Rubin M1911 carbine and M1931 Short Rifle (K31).

According to serial number data, Waffenfabrik Neuhausen produced the M1918 bayonet until approx. 1933. The M1911 Carbine with serial number 140144 was produced in 1926.

11.75 300 17.00 432 .550 14.0 Ricasso: "Waffenfabrik" over "Neuhausen"

Crosspiece:  "140144" and Swiss cross

Scabbard (Tip):  Swiss cross

M1918 This example was made by Elsener (Victorinox) in the 1934–1949 period. Elsener was located in Schwyz Canton. This example was made prior to 1950, when "Victoria" was added to the ricasso marking.

The bayonet and scabbard are unissued. The bayonet lacks a serial number and the scabbard's frog securing tab lacks a buckle hole. The serial number was applied only when the bayonet was paired with a rifle. The scabbard's buckle hole was punched when the scabbard was first mated to a belt frog to ensure a tight fit.

Based on serial number data, it appears that Elsener initially produced the M1918 bayonet until the early 1920s. Elsener resumed production concurrent with introduction of the M1931 Short Rifle in 1934 and continued until M1931 Short Rifle production ceased in 1958.

The Script-P mark identifies the scabbard maker as the firm Paillard AG of St. Croix. Paillard was a very diverse manufacturer who produced an amazing variety of products over its 160 year history. The firm began in 1814 as a watch-maker, however, also produced music boxes, record players, typewriters, radios, and the famous Bolex line of motion picture cameras.

12.75 324 17.75 451 .560 14.2 Ricasso: "Elsener" over "Schwyz"

Crosspiece (lower front): inverted triangle and Swiss cross

Scabbard (body): "P" (in cursive script)

Scabbard (throatpiece): "P" (in cursive script)

Scabbard (Finial): Swiss cross

M1918 Another unissued example. This bayonet was made by Elsener between 1950–1955, after "Victoria" was added to the ricasso marking and before Elsener began producing the M1918/55 variant that combined the M1914 hilt with the M1918 blade. 12.75 324 17.75 451 .560 14.2 Ricasso: "Elsener" over "Schwyz" over "Victoria"

Crosspiece (lower front): inverted triangle and Swiss cross

Scabbard (body): "P" (in cursive script)

Scabbard (throatpiece): "P" (in cursive script)

Belt Frog Leather belt frog for carrying the various Schmidt-Rubin bayonets.  This example came on the M1889 bayonet pictured above.

Made in 1917 by Saddler Fritz Pauli of Biberist, in Solorthurn Canton.

Measures 7.375 in. (187 mm.) long by 3.00 in. (76 mm.) wide at the widest point.

Carter classified this frog as #410.

Go to the Bayonet Belt Frogs Page.

n/a n/a n/a Reverse: "Fritz Pauli" over "Sattler" over "Biberist" all inside an oval, over "17"

Also "Sch" over Swiss cross, inside a rectangle.

Stgw. 57 Knife bayonet for use on the renowned 7.5 mm. Sturmgewehr 57 assault rifle (the Rolls Royce of assault rifles), made by the firm Schweizerische Industrie-Gesellschaft (S.I.G.).

The Stgw. 57 had a very long service life, remaining in production from 1958–1983.

As the low serial number suggests, this is an early example. The "W + F" mark indicates assembly by Waffenfabrik Bern, while "Victoria Schwyz" identifies the blade supplier as the firm, Victorinox, located in Schwyz Canton.

The scabbard has the leather tab for securing in the Schmidt-Rubin belt frog. Most early scabbards had the tab removed when the Swiss changed over to the button-style frog commonly associated with the Stgw. 57 bayonet.

To avoid conflict, the Swiss government gave half of the military knife & bayonet blade production quota to Wenger and half to Victorinox. Victorinox acquired Wenger in 2005, however, continues marketing products under both trademarks.

S.I.G. produced an export model bayonet to go with export versions of the Stgw. 57. The only significant customer was Chile, who purchased 14,500 rifles chambered for the 7.62 mm. NATO cartridge. The 510–4 export bayonet differs from the domestic Stgw. 57 bayonet in minor details.

9.375 240 14.375 365 .875 22.2 Ricasso (left): stylized "F" over "+W" inside a circle.

Ricasso (right): "Victoria" over "Schwyz" over "2935"

Scabbard (throatpiece): "U" and stylized "F" over "+W" inside a circle.

Stgw. 57 A later example, with the simplified blade marking. "V" above the serial number identifying the blade supplier as Victorinox.

The Script-P mark identifies the scabbard maker as the firm Paillard AG of St. Croix. This scabbard no longer has the leather securing tab, so would be carried using the frogs made for carrying the Stgw. 57 and Stgw. 90 bayonet.

 

9.375 238 14.375 365 .875 22.2 Ricasso: stylized "F" over "+W" inside a circle.  "V" over "417121"

Crosspiece:  "KV146"

Grip: "G" over "M"

Scabbard (throatpiece): "P" (in cursive script)

Stgw. 57 An early example, with the blade produced by Wenger & Co. of Delemont. The blade has the full spelling of "Wenger" above the serial number.

This example has the early style scabbard, with the leather securing tab, for use with the Schmidt-Rubin belt frog.

 

 

9.375 238 14.50 368 .875 22.2 Ricasso (left): stylized "F" over "+W" inside a circle.

Ricasso (right): "Wenger" over "9900"

Crosspiece:  Swiss cross

Grip: "W"

Scabbard (throat): "MZ"
Stgw. 57 A later example, with the simplified blade marking. "W" above the serial number identifying the blade supplier as Wenger. 9.50 240 14.50 368 .875 22.2 Ricasso: stylized "F" over "+W" inside a circle.  "W" over "115262"

Crosspiece:  "KV146"

Scabbard:  "" superimposed on a starburst inside a circle.  "B" over "3015" inside a circle.  "K9" inside a circle.

Belt Frog Leather belt frog for carrying the Stgw. 57 bayonet.

Made in 1989 by A. Bucher, Wolhusen.

Measures 7.25 in. (185 mm.) long by 2.50 in (65 mm.) wide.

Carter classified this frog as #588.

Go to the Bayonet Belt Frogs Page.

n/a n/a n/a Reverse: "A. Bucher" over "8  Wolhusen 9"
Belt Frog Plastic belt frog introduced in 1990 with the Stgw. 90 bayonet. It is often found with the Stgw. 57 bayonet. Constructed of plastic reinforced with cloth, using aluminum rivets and an aluminum frog stud.

This example was made by the textiles firm of Werner Fasler, Tramstrasse 5, 5034 Suhr.

The frog measures 7.625 in. (194 mm.) long by 2.25 in. (57 mm.) wide.

Carter classified this frog as #589.

Go to the Bayonet Belt Frogs Page.

n/a n/a n/a Reverse: "Fasler 5034 Suhr"
S.I.G. 530/540 /542 Socket bayonet for use on the 5.56 mm. NATO caliber Schweizerische Industrie-Gesellschaft (S.I.G.) 530, 540, and 542, assault rifles. This bayonet bears a resemblance to the Type C socket bayonet used on some variants of the Belgian FN–FAL assault rifle.

The 22 mm. socket diameter allows firing of the NATO-standard 22 mm. rifle grenades.

The 530 was S.I.G.'s first 5.56 mm. rifle, developed during the late 1960s. It was a very costly weapon and was never purchased in quantity by any military organization. The 530 gave rise to the 540 and 542 models, which were more affordable.

MANURHIN (Manufacture de Machines du Haut Rhin), Mulhouse, Vichy in France licensed and produced the 540 and 542 as an interim infantry weapon in the 1980s, until the FAMAS rifle was available in sufficient numbers. The 540 was also produced in Portugal and Chile.

Since these bayonets are devoid of markings, it is not possible to determine whether this example was made in France or Switzerland.

7.00 178 11.00 280 .870 22.1 None.
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Bayonets of Switzerland

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