Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade Length Overall length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
     
in.
mm.
in.
mm.
in.
mm.
 
Thumbnail image of the Uruguayan Mauser M1871 socket bayonetThumbnail image of the Uruguayan Mauser M1871 socket bayonetThumbnail image of the Uruguayan Mauser M1871 socket bayonetThumbnail image of the Uruguayan Mauser M1871 socket bayonetThumbnail Image of belgiuan scabbard used with Uruguayan m1871 Mauser socket bayonetThumbnail Image of belgiuan scabbard used with Uruguayan m1871 Mauser socket bayonetThumbnail Image of belgiuan scabbard used with Uruguayan m1871 Mauser socket bayonetThumbnail Image of belgiuan scabbard used with Uruguayan m1871 Mauser socket bayonetThumbnail images of uruguayan M1871 socket bayonet mounted to Mauser rifleThumbnail images of uruguayan M1871 socket bayonet mounted to Mauser rifle M1871 Mauser Socket bayonet for use with the 11 mm. M1871 Mauser rifle. This bayonet is a conversion of the British Pattern 1853 Enfield socket bayonet.

Designated by Uruguay, Bayoneta de Cubo para los rifles Mauser Mod. 1870 (Socket Bayonet for Mauser Model 1870 Rifles), little is known about this uncommon socket bayonet. It was used by both Uruguay and Japan with M1871 Mauser rifles procured from Steyr in the 1880s. The bayonet conversion work is believed to have been done by one of the Liege, Belgium arms producers. The British cancellation mark on the ricasso clearly shows that this example had prior service. Although the socket bayonet lacks the formidable appearance of the German M1871 sword bayonet, it would have been a much less costly alternative.

The conversion entailed replacing the Enfield socket with a much shorter 2.125 in. (54 mm.) socket having a wide mortise and thin bridge. The locking ring is unique in that it is one solid piece, with no screw, simply pressed around the socket. The modifications are apparent in this comparison image.

The scabbard has a leather throat and body, with a steel ball finial. This example was issued into Belgian Army service in 1890, as indicated by the markings. The first number on the scabbard body is a regimental roll number and the second the year of issue.

This scabbard was used domestically by the Belgians with the M1867 Albini-Braendlin socket bayonet, as well as for export on bayonets such as this.

This bayonet is historically significant as one of only two socket bayonet types ever used with a Mauser rifle. Both were conversions, there never being a socket bayonet actually designed for use with a Mauser.

The other Mauser socket bayonet is the Spanish M1871/93, a conversion of the M1871 Remington rolling block socket bayonet used with the 7 mm. Mauser M1893 rifle.

17.75 451 19.875 505 .695 17.7 Ricasso: partial former marking overstamped with the British "sold from service" cancellation mark and "S"

Scabbard (body): "186" and "1890"

Scabbard (finial): "P" inside a square

Thumbnail image of Uruguay M1894 knife bayonetThumbnail image of Uruguay M1894 knife bayonetThumbnail image of Uruguay M1894 knife bayonetThumbnail image of Uruguay M1894 knife bayonetThumbnail image of Uruguay M1894 knife bayonetThumbnail image of Uruguay M1894 knife bayonet M1894 Knife bayonet for use with Fabrique Nacionale (FN)-produced 7 mm. Mauser M1894 rifles for Uruguay.

Little is known about these bayonets and their procurement. Janzen identifies them as the M1894. Most Mauser rifle references identify the Uruguay Mauser rifle as M1985. However, collector-researcher John Wall indicates that the Uruguay Mausers were patterned on the M1893 and did not have the mechanical improvements included on the M1895. The Uruguay Mauser rifles are the same as those produced for Brazil, who also designated them M1894. Wall indicates that the Uruguay rifles were produced no later than 1896.

The bayonet is patterned closely on the Belgian M1889 bayonet. The scabbard's frog stud is unique and distinctive. This example was made by Fabrique Nationale (FN) in Belgium. In addition to Belgian production, examples of this bayonet were also made by the German firm Alex Coppel.

11.625 295 16.50 419 .615 15.6 Crosspiece (right): "1"

Crosspiece (rear): "LD" in an oval

Scabbard (frog stud): "A9441"

M1900
Sword bayonet for use on 7 mm. M1895 Mauser rifles that Uruguay purchased from FN in Belgium.

This bayonet is incorrectly identified in some bayonet books as being for use on Mauser M1871 rifles converted to use the 6.5 mm. Daudeteau cartridge by the French firm Société Française d'Armes Portatives (S.F.A.P.) of St. Denis, France.  The agent who facilitated the contract between the Uruguay government and S.F.A.P. was named Dovitiis, so these rifles are sometimes referred to as the Dovitiis-Mauser.

The converted rifle used a barrel band and bayonet mount design patterned after the French Berthier rifle, so could not possibly mount the bayonet shown here.  Bayonets supplied with the converted rifles look just like the French M1886 bayonet, except they have a depression in the left grip to clear the converted rifle’s cleaning rod.

The Uruguayan M1900 bayonet appears to incorporate the blade from the French bayonet originally supplied with the converted rifles, re-hilted for use with what Uruguay designated the Mauser Español-Brasilero Modelo 1895 (Spanish-Brazilian Mauser Model 1895). A picture at left, shows the Uruguay M1900 bayonet mounted to a Mauser rifle. The scabbard is identical to the French M1886, but is unmarked, so likely also came from the M1871 conversion bayonet.

20.50
520
25.375
645
.610
15.5
Hilt: "1950"
M1908 Knife bayonet for use with the 7 mm. M1908 Mauser Infantry Rifle and Short Rifle used by Uruguay. These rifles were made by DWM and were identical to the Brazilian M1908, save for markings.

My identification of this piece as Uruguayan is somewhat speculative. Both of the above references identify a bayonet identical to this as used by Uruguay. However, I haven't found any documentation of a Mauser export pattern bayonet marked "V.C.S." on the ricasso; or that the German firm of Victor Christian Schilling & Co. produced these bayonets and for whom. The meaning of the "S.M.B." marking on the crosspiece is also unknown.

Ball's book, Mauser Military Rifles of the World (4th Ed) has images of Uruguay M1908 rifles dated 1908 and 1909 on the receiver ring. Production would have ceased no later than 1914, with the outbreak of the First World War.

11.00 279 16.125 410 .620 15.7 Ricasso: "V.C.S."

Crosspiece (left): "S.M.B."

Crosspiece (right): "4949"

Back           Next
Return to Bayonet Identification Guide Index
© Ralph E. Cobb 2010 All Rights Reserved       Top

Bayonets of Uruguay

Home Navigation Button
 
Want List Navigation Button
 
Bayonet Collecting Navigation Button
 
Bayonet Identification Guide Navigation Button
 
Researching Your Finds Navigation Button
 
Library Navigation Button
 
Links Page Navigation Button
 
For Sale or Trade Navigation Button
 
BCN Certified Logo
 
Bayonet
Collectors'
Network
 
 
Society of American Bayonet Collectors