Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Muzzle
Ring
Diameter

Markings
      in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Thumbnail image of unidentified plug bayonetThumbnail image of unidentified plug bayonetThumbnail image of unidentified plug bayonetThumbnail image of unidentified plug bayonet Plug Bayonet Plug bayonet of unknown origin.  

It is heavily-constructed, with a double-edged, unfullered blade. The brass crosspiece has spirals with domed finials.  The ferrule and pommel are also brass. The pommel cap is missing, revealing the peened tang. The grip appears made of walnut.

This bayonet is not one of the documented military or hunting styles, so it is unclear who made and used this particular bayonet.
10.875 276 17.125 435 n/a Ricasso: crown-C
Thumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in GermanyThumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in GermanyThumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in GermanyThumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in GermanyThumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in GermanyThumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in GermanyThumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in GermanyThumbnail image of M1874 bayonet produced by Alex Coppel in Germany M1874 Alexander Coppel T-back sword bayonet for use on the 11 mm. M1874 Gras rifle.

The M1874 was a conversion of the M1866 Chassepot design, that enabled use of the 11.15 x 59 mm. centerfire cartridge. The M1874 rifle is referred to as the Gras, after the French Army officer who developed the conversion, Colonel Basile Gras.

A French design, the Gras was also manufactured by Steyr in Austria and exported to Greece, Chile, and other unidentified "overseas-states" (believed to indicate South America and Asia).

The majority of M1874 bayonets were produced at the French state arms plants and by Steyr. French Government M1874 bayonets are marked on the blade spine in French with the factory, month, and year of production. Greek-contract bayonets manufactured by Steyr are marked on the blade spine "Waffenfabrik Steyr" and the year of production.

This example was manufactured in Germany by the firm Alexander Coppel of Solingen. It was once thought that these were made for Belgium, however, that is no longer believed to be correct. The country for which Coppel produced these bayonets is not known.

The ricasso bears the familiar Alex. Coppel "scales" trademark. The only other markings are a Crown over LR on the crosspiece and on the scabbard's ball finial. There are subtle differences in the hilt between the French M1874 and the Coppel M1874. The different shape and angle of the leaf spring is evident in this comparison image. Examples of the Coppel M1874 are scarce and examples that include the correct Coppel scabbard are rare.

Other uncommon M1874 bayonets are those privately produced in France by Sutterlin, Lippmann & Cie. and Francois Louis Henry.

20.625 524 23.375 645 .695 17.7 Ricasso (left): Alex Coppel scales trademark

Crosspiece: "Crown-LR"

Tang (upper): "e. D." inside stippled oval

Tang (lower): "4"

Scabbard (ball finial): "Crown-LR" and "2"

Mauser Bayonet Knife bayonet for use on a rifle based on the Mauser Model 98, most likely for a M1912 Mauser rifle produced by Steyr.

This is a case of knowing who made the bayonet, but not for which country it was made. The ricasso is marked with the trademark of the Swiss firm, Schweizerische Industrie-Gesellschaft (S.I.G.) of Neuhausen.

There is a small shield with a star on the opposite ricasso. A shield with star is typically associated with Chile, however, this does not resemble the shield found on other Chilean M1895 and M1912 bayonets. The scabbard is from a Chilean M1912 bayonet produced by Steyr.

Steyr produced M1912 rifles for Brazil, Chile, Columbia, and Mexico. Chilean rifles were all produced during FY 1912/13, while orders from Columbia, and Brazil were split between FYs 1912/13 and 1913/14. Mexico's order was the smallest and was produced entirely during FY 1913/14.

It could be that S.I.G. fulfilled a bayonet order that was incomplete at Steyr when the First World War broke out. It could also be a wartime order or a post-War order when neither Austrian nor German firms were able to produce arms.

These bayonets surface occasionally, indicating they were produced in quantity, just not very large numbers. Hopefully, further research will lead to clarification regarding which country received these bayonets.

10.00 254 15.125 384 .615 15.6 Ricasso: rifle with superimposed "N"

Ricasso: shield with star

Crosspiece: "A3452"

Pommel: "E"

Scabbard (frog stud): "A9050"

Scabbard (ball finial): triangle mark

Bayonet Modified Belgian M1924 Mauser Export bayonet. The tang has been reshaped to give the hilt a swayback shape. Replacement grips to fit the modified hilt are made of oak.

The bayonet will no longer mount properly to a Mauser 98 rifle. Oak is not normally used for bayonet grips. These factors suggest that this modification is a fantasy piece, not intended for use on a rifle.

The scabbard is in poor condition, although it accepts the bayonet just fine.

11.875 302 17.00 432 .620 15.7 Pommel: "4017"
Thumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 CarbineThumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 CarbineThumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 CarbineThumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 CarbineThumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 CarbineThumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 CarbineThumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 CarbineThumbnail image of unknown bayonet for U.S. M1 Carbine M6 Modified U.S. Bayonet-Knife M6 modified to mount to the caliber .30 U.S. Carbine M1.

The crosspiece is modified by grinding the lower portion of the M6 crosspiece to a width comparable to the Second World War M4 Bayonet-Knife crosspiece. The larger M6 muzzle-ring was cut off, then a crude, smaller muzzle-ring welded in place. Finally, a filler plate was added to position the crosspiece further forward of the grip. The upper pommel has also been milled away to provide clearance for the M1 Carbine's longer bayonet lug.

The modifications evidence crude hand work, suggesting these were done by a country that lacked modern production facilities. Most likely an Asian country. Burma, Cambodia, Laos, rhe Phillippenes, Thailand, and (South) Vietnam all received M1 Carbines in quantity through the Military Assistance Program (MAP). However, only the Philippenes and Viernam have similarly received M14 rifles, so the presence of M6 bayonets is not well explained. The North would undoubtedly have come into possession of both M1 Carbines and M14 rifles and bayonets post-1975. While Vietnam is clearly capable of better work than this, perhaps, they transferred M6 bayonets to a neighboring country like Cambodia, Laos, or Thailand. Hopefully, further research will lead to clarification regarding which country modified these bayonets.

Although the original maker marking is gone, the Defence Acceptance Stamp (DAS) is still present. The DAS is oriented with the stars toward the blade, which was done by the Imperial Knife Co. of Providence, Rhode Island.

The scabbard is a U.S. M8A1, assembled at the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind, in Philadelphia, PA. The "TWB" marking was used 1969-1970 to represent the Working Home's corporate name, The Working Blind, Inc.

Read more about the Working Home's production of scabbards in my article: M8A1 Scabbards Produced at the Pennsylvania Working Home for the Blind.

6.125 156 11.125 283 .610 15.5 Crosspiece: Defense Acceptance Stamp

Scabbard: "U.S. M8A1" over "TWB"

Scabbard Body: "A" over "36"

Thumbnail image of movie prop bayonetThumbnail image of movie prop bayonetThumbnail image of movie prop bayonet Movie Prop Bayonet Cast aluminum facsimile of a German M1884/98 Third Pattern bayonet for use as a movie prop.

This cast-aluminum movie prop bayonet is of the type used in elaborate Second World War feature films such as The Longest Day and Stalingrad.

The bayonet is a one-piece casting, painted to resemble a German M1884/98 Third Pattern bayonet used with the 8 mm. Mauser Kar 98k rifle. Not historically-significant, but an interesting curiosity.

n/a 15.50 394 n/a None.
Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog.Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog.Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog.Thumbnail image of unknown leather bayonet belt frog. Belt Frog Brown leather belt frog that was advertised as Yugoslavian, but does not match known Yugoslavian frog patterns.

The long straight belt loop, triangle stitching, and brass thorn are consistent with known Yugoslavian frogs. However, the placement of the hilt strap and shape of the front piece are not.

Measures 9.75 in. (248 mm.) long by 2.00 in.(51 mm.) wide at the widest point.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a None.
Thumbnail image of unknown web belt frogThumbnail image of unknown web belt frog Belt Frog Olive green web belt frog that came on this South African FN–FAL Type C bayonet with an early FN-produced steel scabbard.

The frog exhibits characteristics of both the Portuguese Infantry Belt Frog and the South African Pattern 1970 Frog, but is not an exact match to either.

The frog measures 7.50 in. (191 mm.) long by 1.375 in. (35 mm.) wide.

This frog was not classified by Carter.

Bayonet Belt Frogs Page

n/a n/a n/a Reverse: illegible mark
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© Ralph E. Cobb 2010 All Rights Reserved       Top

Unknown / Unidentified Bayonets

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