Country Pictures
(click to enlarge)
Type Description Blade
Length
Overall
Length

Socket
Diameter

Markings
   
 
  in. mm. in. mm. in. mm.  
Austria Thumbnail image, overall view of M1854 socket bayonetThumbnail image of M1854 socketThumbnail image of partial unit marking on M1854 elbowThumbnail image of inspection markings on M1854 elbowThumbnail image of M1854 blade, overhead viewThumbnail image of M1854 blade, bottom view M1854 Socket bayonet for use with the 13.9 mm. (.54 caliber) M1854 Lorenz rifle. This bayonet was also used with the M1854/67 Wanzl breech loading conversions.

The M1854 bayonet is easily identified by the helical mortise and flattened cruciform blade profile. The socket length measures 3.187 in. (81 mm.).

The Lorenz was imported in quantity by both sides during the U.S. Civil War. The Union imported over 225,000 and the Confederacy perhaps as many as 100,000, making the Lorenz second only to the .577 caliber Enfield rifle-musket, as the most common imported firearm.

19.00 483 22.187 564 .755 19.2 Elbow (left): Starburst and circle-L

Elbow (right): "61.280.

Thumbnail image of Austrian Scabbard for M1891 Socket BayonetThumbnail image of Austrian Scabbard for M1891 Socket BayonetThumbnail image of Austrian Scabbard for M1891 Socket BayonetThumbnail image of Austrian Scabbard for M1891 Socket BayonetThumbnail image of Austrian Scabbard for M1891 Socket Bayonet Scabbard for M1891 Socket Bayonet Scabbard for use with Russian M1891 socket bayonets captured during the First World War, along with 7.62 mm. Mosin-Nagant rifles.

Russia did not supply a scabbard, preferring that soldiers keep the bayonet fixed all of the time. However, Finland, Germany, and Austria manufactured scabbards for use with bayonets captured from the Russians.

n/a 17.50 445 n/a None.
Belgium Thumbnail image of Belgian M1867 Albini-Braendlin socket bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian M1867 Albini-Braendlin socket bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian M1867 Albini-Braendlin socket bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian M1867 Albini-Braendlin socket bayonet M1867/41 Albini- Braendlin Socket bayonet for use with the 11 mm. M1867 Albini-Braendlin rifle. The Albini-Braendlin rifle was a breechloading conversion of earlier M1841 and M1853 muskets.

This example is a conversion of the earlier M1841 socket bayonet, as is evidenced by the off-center bridge and brazing lines on the socket. New-made M1867 bayonets were also produced.

This scabbard was also used with export production by the Liege firms, such as the Uruguayan M1871 Mauser socket bayonet.

 

18.25 464 20.875 530 .675 17.1 Socket: "N2334" various proofmarks

Locking Ring: "-LL"

Scabbard (body): "186?" overstamped with "1890"

Scabbard (finial): "P" inside a square

  Thumbnail image of Belgian FAL Type C socket bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian FAL Type C socket bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian FAL Type C socket bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian FAL Type C socket bayonet FAL Type C Socket bayonet introduced in the 1960s for the FN–FAL assault rifles that incorporated the 22 mm. NATO-spec flash hider.

This example is parkerized, with black paint over the parkerizing on the socket only.

Two models of spring catch were used on the FAL Type C bayonet. The M1963 with serrations and the M1965 with 'wings."

This scabbard is an uncommon Fabrique Nationale (FN) steel-bodied scabbard. Note that the throatpiece is oriented so that the socket faces outward when carried. This is typical of most FAL Type C scabbards.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.50 165 11.25 286 .890 22.6 None.
  Thumbnail image of Belgian FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of Belgian FAL Type C bayonet FAL Type C This example is parkerized, with black paint applied over the parkerizing on the socket.

The plastic scabbard has a flattened round metal frog stud.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.25 159 11.25 286 .890 22.6 None.
  FAL Type C This example is painted black overall and has an unusual scabbard. The scabbard is unusual in a couple of respects:

—It has a U.S. M1910-style wire belt hanger affixed to the scabbard throat piece.

—The throatpiece is oriented so that the socket faces inwards when carried. This orientation is generally associated with South African scabbards, however, this scabbard is not South African.

The bayonet's serial number is in a larger font than is typically observed.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.25 159 11.25 286 .890 22.6 Socket: "229508"

Scabbard (body): "646" in yellow paint

  Thumbnail image, overall view of cast FAL Type C bayonet.Thumbnail image of cast FAL Type C bayonet socketThumbnail image, bottom view of cast FAL TYpe C bayonet socket and spring catchThumbnail image, close up of spring catch on cast FAL Type C bayonetThumbnail image of scabbrd from cast FAL Type C bayonet FAL Type C This is believed to be the final FN production type, as FN sought to reduce cost of the FAL product.

FN constructed the socket by forging upper and lower halves using a drop hammer. Hot metal was poured in between the halves, to make the complete blank, which was machined to create the tubular socket. The sprue line is evident in the pictures at left. The earlier FAL Type C bayonets had a one-piece drawn socket.

I have seen an unfinished casting that has a FN mold mark, so know that FN used this construction method. The scabbard body is plastic, with an integral web belt hanger.

This construction method was subsequently used by the German firm, A. Eickhorn GmbH of Solingen (AES). These images of the FN (top) and AES (bottom) show differences that distinguish the two makers' production.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.75 165 11.375 289 .890 22.6 None.
Brazil FAL Type C This example has the M1965 spring catch and a black paint finish. The scabbard is plastic, with an integral cotton web belt hanger.

The snap fastener on the belt frog is marked "Eberle." Eberle S.A. is a Brazilian firm that manufactures, among other things, textile fasteners. The identification of this bayonet as having been made by IMBEL is based on the identification of the belt hanger's fasteners. IMBEL is an abbreviation for Industry Material Bélico do Brasil (Military Material Industry of Brasil), the State arms factory formerly known as Fabrica de Itajuba.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.75 165 11.375 289 .890 22.6 Snap (belt hanger):  "Eberle"
SAR-48 (FAL Type C) A commercial bayonet shipped with the Springfield Armory Inc. SAR–48 rifle. The SAR–48 rifles were semi-auto FAL rifles produced by IMBEL in Brazil for commercial sale in the USA by Springfield Armory Inc.

This example would have been produced in the 1980s. The bayonet is unmarked, with a black paint finish overall.

The scabbard has a plastic body, with an integral nylon web belt frog. The throatpiece is positioned so the socket faces outward. The belt frog has the U.S. M1910-style wire belt hanger. The hilt strap button is made of copper.

The SAR–48 bayonet is unusual in being of late manufacture, but having the M1963 serrated spring catch.

FN-FAL Bayonets Page

6.375 162 11.375 289 .890 22.6 Snap and Rivets (belt hanger):  "Eberle"
Britain Thumbnail image of long-shanled socket bayonetThumbnail image of long-shanled socket bayonetThumbnail image of long-shanled socket bayonetThumbnail image of long-shanled socket bayonetThumbnail image of long-shanled socket bayonetThumbnail image of long-shanled socket bayonet Long Shank Dutch/Liege Socket Bayonet Socket bayonet for use with an .80 caliber flintlock musket.

The long shank Dutch/Liege socket bayonet was among the earliest socket bayonet patterns. It was used by Britain and likely other countries. In 1715, at the end of the War of Spanish Succession (Queen Anne's War), Britain purchased 20,000 Dutch muskets and flat-bladed bayonets to replenish depleted Army stores until British production could make up for wartime losses. In his book, The Socket Bayonet in the British Army 1687–1783, author-researcher Erik Goldstein, illustrates a nearly identical bayonet, marked in the same way as this example, as the type believed purchased by Britain in 1715.

This example has a two-step I–mortise, indicating that it is the earliest of its type. Most had a third step added during their service life to create a L–mortise, however, this example remains unmodified. The blade is of a flattened hexagonal cross-section, with long shank and a square shoulder with no guard. Later short-shanked Dutch/Liege bayonets had a prominent oval guard at the blade shoulder.

The bayonet is made of iron, which probably accounts for its acquiring a slight bend near the point. The socket is formed by an overlapping weld at the top. The socket length is 2.9375 in. (75 mm.). The blade width is 1.125 in. (29 mm.).

A very scarce bayonet, seldom encountered outside of a museum.

12.00 305 16.50 419 1.00 25.4 Socket: "O" over "No   ?063"
Volunteer Sword/Socket Socket bayonet for use with a .65 caliber flintlock musket.

These were made outside of the British Ordnance System for private sale. This example is identical to bayonet B58 documented in Skennerton's book. According to Skennerton, these date from 1775–1800.

The blade is single edged with a shallow fuller on both sides. Blade is 1.25 in (32 mm.) wide. The horizontal blade orientation positions the blade edge down when fixed. The 3.625 in. (92 mm.) socket is cut for a top stud.

This design was not widely used, so these don't turn up all that often.

19.875 505 23.50 597 .855 21.7 Ricasso: "CC"

Collar: "2" "X" and two sets of two parallel hash marks

Pattern 1853 Socket bayonet for use with the Pattern 1853 Enfield Rifle-Musket.

This example has no British government markings, indicating that it was likely imported to the USA during the American Civil War.

According to British socket bayonet authority Graham Priest, the “J•R” marking indicates that the bayonet was likely made in Liege, Belgium. The other ricasso marking may be an incomplete CHAVASSE. There was a retailer, Horace Chavasse & Co., at Alma street, Aston Newton (near Birmingham, England) 1860–1868. Chavasse has been documented as also having marked and exported P1856 sword bayonets.

The socket length is 3.00 in. (78 mm.).

17.25 438 20.25 514 .787 20.0 Ricasso: "P (dot) B" and “CHAVAS”

Socket (rear edge): 2 punch marks and 7 notches

Pattern 1895 Socket bayonet for use on the .303 caliber M1895 Martini-Enfield rifle.  The Pattern 1895 bayonets were altered Pattern 1876 bayonets, originally made for the caliber .577–450 Martini-Henry rifle.

This example was converted at the Royal Small Arms Factory, Enfield Lock (RSAF Enfield) in January 1900. This example saw service in the Middle East, probably Egypt.

According to Skennerton, Pattern 1895 bayonet conversions were only done at Enfield, with 86,234 conversions done between 1895 and 1902.

Alterations include compressing the socket to the smaller diameter, filling the original mortise, and cutting a new mortise 90 degrees from the original to allow the bayonet to hang underneath the barrel when fixed. A filled portion of the original P1876 mortise is visible under bright light.

The socket length is 3.00 in. (78 mm.).

21.50 546 25.125 638 .650 16.5 Ricasso: broad arrow proofmark and "1 00" and Enfield inspector and bending test proof marks.

Blade (Right): "479" in Arabic

Blade (Left):  "184" in Arabic lined through and British inspector mark

No. 4 Mk. I Socket bayonet for use with the caliber .303 Lee-Enfield No. 4 rifle. These saw extensive use during the Second World War and into the 1950s, when the Lee-Enfield was superseded by the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber FN–FAL assault rifle.

The No. 4 Mk. I was beautifully made, with its distinctive cruciform blade. The bayonet and socket were one solid forging. No. 4 Mk. I markings were reminiscent of how Pattern 1907 bayonets were marked, with the royal cypher, type, and maker.

Only 75,000 of this type were made. Production occurred during the latter half of 1941 and into the early months of 1942. The only maker was the Singer Manufacturing Co. (the famous sewing machine people), at their Clydebank, Scotland plant. One influence in the selection of Singer was that Scotland was felt to be safer from German bombers, than England.

No. 4 Spike Bayonets page

8.00 203 10.00 254 .595 15.1 "G (Crown) R" over No 4 Mk I" over "S M"

Spring Catch:  "SM" over "41"

No. 4 Mk. II The No. 4 Mk. II was a simplified version, eliminating the milling cuts required to create the cruciform blade flutes. The No. 4 Mk. II was otherwise identical to the Mk. I, with the bayonet and socket one solid forging.

Three firms produced the No. 4 Mk. II: Singer in Scotland, the Savage Stevens Co. in the USA, and Long Branch in Canada. The No. 4 Mk. II was, by far, the most numerous variant, with over 3.3 million units produced.

No. 4 Spike Bayonets page

8.00 203 10.00 254 .595 15.1 Varies (see No. 4 Spike page)
No. 4 Mk. II* The No. 4 Mk. II* (pronounced: number four, mark two, star) was a further simplified version, with the socket and blade two separate forgings. This lowered costs and allowed manufacture by subcontractors. This also disbursed production, mitigating the risk of production being interrupted by bombing. Two-piece construction gives the No. 4 Mk. II* its characteristic stepped join between blade and socket.

Four firms produced the No. 4 Mk. II*, all in the UK: Prince-Smith & Stells, Howard & Bullough, Lewisham Engineering, and the Baird Manufacturing Co. 1.4 million No. 4 Mk. II* bayonets were produced, over a million of which were produced by Prince-Smith. The other makers were much less prolific.

The finish varies considerably between manufacturers, with Baird bayonets approaching the excellent finish of the No. 4 Mk. I and some Prince-Smith examples exhibiting rough tool marks.

No. 4 Spike Bayonets page

8.00 203 10.00 254 .595 15.1 Varies (see No. 4 Spike page)

No. 4 Mk. III The No. 4 Mk. III was the final, and crudest, form of the No. 4 spike bayonet. The socket is fabricated by welding together seven sheet steel stampings, eliminating the socket forging process altogether. Even the spring plunger is a stamping.

196,200 were produced, all by Joseph Lucas Ltd., Chester Street, Birmingham.

The No. 4 Mk. III was declared obsolete in 1946.

No. 4 Spike Bayonets page

8.00 203 10.00 254 .595 15.1 Lucas marked the bayonets with M158 on the top pf the socket.

The rod of this example is marked S7, indicating manufacture by subcontractor Auto Engineering Ltd. of Croydon. Auto Engineering produced approx. 30,000 rod forgings.

Thumbnail image of STEN Mk. I socket bayonetThumbnail image of STEN Mk. I socket bayonetThumbnail image of STEN Mk. I socket bayonetThumbnail image of STEN Mk. I socket bayonetThumbnail image of STEN Mk. I socket bayonetThumbnail image of STEN Mk. I socket bayonetThumbnail image of STEN Mk. I socket bayonet STEN Mk. I Socket bayonet for use with the 9 mm. caliber STEN Mk. II submachine gun.

The STEN Mk. I bayonet was fabricated out of sheet steel and utilized a rod-style blade copied from the No. 4 Mk. II* socket bayonet. Although the STEN rod was of a larger diameter, this enabled the STEN Mk. I bayonet to use the existing No. 4 scabbard. Even more crude than the later No. 4 Mk. III bayonet, the STEN Mk. I represented the ultimate in Second World War bayonet simplicity.

The firm of B. & J. Sippel Ltd. produced the sheet steel parts. Spikes marked with the lowercase ”L” are believed to be made by Laspee Engineering Co. of Isleworth. This example was assembled by the firm Grundy Ltd. of Teddington. The socket bears Grundy’s dispersal code, “S41”. The socket also bears a partial Broad Arrow acceptance mark.

The large forward projection on the stamped spring steel catch serves as a fingerguard, so the bayonet can also be used as a hand weapon.

75,280 bayonets were believed produced during 1943–1944, 55,800 by Grundy Ltd. and 19,480 by N.J. Edmonds Ltd. Nearly all of the bayonets were believed scrapped, making period examples, such as this one, quite rare today.

More info on the STEN Mk. I makers and history.

8.00 203 12.00 305 .740 18.8 Socket: "B & J. S. Ltd" and "S41" and partial Broad Arrow

Blade: lowercase "L"

Spring: " B & J. S. L"

No. 7 Mk. I/L The No. 7 Mk. I/L (pronounced: number seven, mark one, land service) was a very innovative and complex design, with a unique swiveling pommel. Part knife bayonet and part socket bayonet, the No. 7 Mk. I/L would mount to the Lee Enfield No. 4 rifle, the Mk. V Sten machine carbine, and the Sterling L2 submachine gun.

The No. 7 Mk. I/L was designed by the Wilkinson Sword Co., who produced 1,000 bayonets in 1944. Mass production was carried out by four manufacturers from 1945–1948: BSA, Elkington & Co., ROF Poole, and ROF Newport.

The No. 5 Mk. I scabbard was also used with the No. 7 and No. 9 socket bayonets.

More info on No. 7 Mk. I/L makers, markings, and history.

7.875 200 12.25 311 .885

.595

22.5

15.1

Varies.
No. 9 Mk. I Socket bayonet for use with the .303 caliber Lee-Enfield No. 4 rifle. The No. 9 Mk. I was adopted in 1947 and used until the Lee-Enfield was superseded by the 7.62 mm. NATO caliber FN–FAL assault rifle.

In Britain, the No. 9 Mk. I was produced primarily by ROF Poole and RSAF Enfield. Three private makers also produced small quantities. In Pakistan, Metal Industries Ltd. produced a small run in 1951 and the Pakistan Ordnance Factory produced much larger quantities during the 1950s and 1960s. South Africa also produced a variant of the No. 9, with a different blade profile.

No. 9 Bayonets Page

8.00 203 10.125 257 .595 15.1 Varies.
Socket Bayonets— Page 2    Page 3    Page 4    Page 5
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© Ralph E. Cobb 2011 All Rights Reserved
The socket bayonet first appeared in the 1690s and continues in use today. The following pages barely scratch the surface, but provide a type-specific approach to the socket bayonets included on this site. Far from comprehensive, these pages have a variety of examples, dating from the 1750s to the present day.

Socket Bayonets

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